Home Blog

A teen gate-crashed their gondola doing the

0

Someone needs to crack the instance .
Image: Getty Images

By now, you’ve heard about the egg, which outshone a photo of Kylie Jenner’s daughter, Stormi, on Sunday as the most-liked post on Instagram.

But who did the egg? Whose dumb but eventually successful impression was this?

Here’s what we know even further 😛 TAGEND

1. The egg history holder goes by “Henrietta.”

Henrietta is, according to a report from BuzzFeed News, a “chicken from the British countryside.”

2. The accounting holder, however, claims to live in London.

“I’m an individual living in London, ” the history owner told The Independentearlier the coming week . They too revealed that they only have 400 followers on their personal Instagram account.

Sources close to Mashable have also independently confirmed that the egg is a man who lives in the London area.

3. The egg’s name is Eugene, allegedly.

In some interviews, the account owner goes by the name Eugene, bypassing the whole “Henrietta” schtick entirely.

4. The person who did the egg was participating in dry January at the time.

Nothing reproductions clevernes like abruptly not drinking.

5. Love of the egg are called the “Egg Gang.”

Sure.

6. The egg history follows 928 reports and two hashtags.

The hashtags are #WSHH — WorldStarHipHop — and #FatBoySSE, who is a rapper from New Jersey.

7. Supreme Patty is a suspect.

So far, the only public figure to have implied responsibility for the egg is Supreme Patty, an Instagram star who smokes red-hot sauce and is known for squeezing lemon juice into his own attentions. While Patty didn’t claim he did the egg outright, one of his friends did say so in a TMZ interview.( This is, of course, to be taken with a lemon-sized grain of salt .)

For what it’s worth, we do not reckon Supreme Patty did the egg. It’s more likely that he’s merely capitalizing on the big-hearted meme of the moment. He did get an egg tattoo, though, so kudos on committing to the bit. And the egg does follow him on Instagram.

We’ve reached out to Supreme Patty and will inform this berth if we hear back.

8. Okay, the egg note says it’s not Supreme Patty.

In an Instagram story posted on Tuesday, @world_record_egg claimed the TMZ story was bogus. “We’re still anonymous. Fake news, ” they wrote.

Image: Instagram

So we guess it’s not Supreme Patty. Stay chanted for more egg updates.

This tale is developing …

UPDATE: Jan. 16, 2019, 1:34 p.m. ET This narration was updated to include information regarding the egg’s Instagram Story as well as the hashtags it follows.

UPDATE: Jan. 17, 2019, 10:03 a.m. ET This narrative was updated to confirm the egg’s city of residence.

The astonishing disappearing act of Beto O’Rourke

0

#Betomania became #Betofatigue in six short months can the Texas Democrat rise again and reveal voters what type of president hed be?

When Beto O’Rourke travelled to Yosemite in California to unveil his $ 5tn plan on climate change, a ripple of amaze swept America. How did the tall white guy with the funny first name known for his punk past, Beatnik road tours and fondness for campaigning atop counters get to be the first Democratic nominee to extol on the crisis of our age?

This wasn’t the O’Rourke that the country had grown used to during his battle with Ted Cruz last-place November for a US Senate seat. Then, the Texas Democrat had propelled himself to within three percentage points of victory, and with it national stardom, by making viral communications about NFL participates takinga knee and by instilling hope through a feel-good but preferably wishy-washy call to unity.

Now here he was framed against the glamour of Yosemite Falls, delivering a granular plan of action worthy of the most nerdish policy wonk. Coming from a politician from oil-rich Texas who has been criticized for his track record on fossil fuels, his proposals for the largest 10 -year investment in history and a goal of net-zero releases by 2050 caught many off guard.

” We were agreeably astounded ,” said David Turnbull of the climate advocacy radical Oil Change US.” When you investigate someone like Beto O’Rourke calling for the elimination of fossil fuel subsidies and an point to fossil fuel leasing on public estates- that’s moving in the right direction .”

There was another group of people hoping to be agreeably surprised by the Yosemite announcement that day- O’Rourke himself and his crew of expedition consultants. They have been fighting with one of the great magical riddles of the early period of the 2020 presidential election.

That is: the astonishing disappearing act of Beto O’Rourke.

Beto
Beto O’Rourke listen to environmental exponents on 29 April 2019, in Yosemite national park, California. Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/ AP

Like Houdini, O’Rourke has proceeded from figurehead of stage to a gulp of cigarette in six short months. #Betomania morphed into #Betofatigue, apparently overnight.

Look back on the events of 7 November 2018, when he delivered his conceding speech, having lost to Cruz in a packed sports stadium in El Paso, and “youre seeing” the compare. At that time he was lauded as the politician who could do the hopeless: challenge a virulent Republican like Ted Cruz in a solid red territory like Texas and is consistent with an inch of victory.

Next stop Donald Trump? But from the moment he launched his presidential bid in March, he has been struggling. Those very qualities that had been the recipe of his relative success in Texas abruptly became liabilities.

His charming roads and good looks were hurled back in his face as lily-white privilege. That wasn’t helped when he passed Vanity Fair a gift of a one-liner on the eve of open-” Man, I’m just suffer are in conformity with it”- that stimulated numerous Democrat wince.

The mere decision to run for the White House was interpreted as chutzpah. As the Daily Beast callously set it:” Reacting to losing to Ted Cruz by extending for chairwoman is like failing to land a role in a community theater production and was determined to take your genius to Broadway .”

In the latest poll from Quinnipiac university, O’Rourke is drawing a glum 5% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters. He is being outgunned on 10% by Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who has stolen much of his thunder.

” We’ve seen Mayor Pete take the lead in the newcomer district ,” said Quinnipiac’s Peter Brown who predicted worse to come.” We’ve got 18 months to go and I pot there will be other fresh faces taking the spotlight .”

So what happens next to O’Rourke now that the spotlight has swung away from him? Can he completed the Houdini trick and make a reappearance? And if he can, what kind of potential president would he present to the American people?

‘He was always exceedingly focused’

Examining those questions, it quickly becomes clear that all superhighways Beto lead to El Paso. That’s the dust-covered, sunbaked mete town in Texas where he was born Robert Francis O’Rourke in 1972.

His father, Pat, was a businessman and judge, and his mother, Melissa, led a furniture store. They were comfortably off and worded part of the lily-white middle class elite in a city that is 80% Latino.

O’Rourke’s opposings have tried to depict his youth as one of fecklessness and depravity. Rightwing pundits like to poke him for the appoint “Beto”, claiming it is a conceit designed to suggest that he has Latino beginnings, which he does not.

They also point to a drunk-driving episode in 1998, his teenaged flirtation with his punk strip Foss and to the period when he floundered around in New York City working as a glorified maid. Reuters recently encouraged to that pile of possibilities negative assault cloth with the revelation that O’Rourke had secretly belonged to the prominent “hactivist” radical Cult of the Dead Cow.

But those who have known O’Rourke for years say they do not recognize this caricature of the bungle wild son from the border town. Take Maggie Asfahani, a writer and El Paso restaurateur, who had a teenaged romance with O’Rourke when he was at an all-male boarding school in Virginia.

Asfahani clearly recalls their first encounter in an El Paso mall when he was back on holiday. Her memory instantaneously makes to rest any suggestion that ” Beto ” was an adult affectation.” I’d imagined this Mexican kid, given the name, but there was this really tall white guy. I can categorically dismiss all that speculation- he was’ Beto’ at least since I’ve known him in “schools ” .”

Asfahani can also, incidentally, put to rest any scurrilous talk about a much replicated picture of O’Rourke flanked by his Foss bandmates in which he wears a long floral dress.

” I was intended to put one over the record, that is my dress he’s wearing ,” she said.” There’s nothing specially complicated about it- we were all hanging out, and someone thought it would be funny if we swopped clothes, girl children and guys. That was all, merely being different .”

What struck Asfahani then as now was something that’s been lost amid the presidential chatter – his seriousness.” He was always extremely focused. He was this furiously intelligent, curious person who was into things, always wanting to learn things, ever with a journal in his hand .”

Asfahani remains in touch with O’Rourke to this day. She considers the flak he has taken over unearned entitlement since he entered the 2020 hasten, based on her knowledge of the man, has been unfair.

” It impresses me he is finding his course on the national stage ,” she said.” He’s being open and honest and susceptible, hoping parties will relate to that and look themselves in it. That’s not a fault: it has been his personality since I’ve known him .”

‘He learned how to take vitality from crowds’

O’Rourke’s has entered into politics followed his return to El Paso, the prodigal son, at age 26. Having been largely away since his teens, he re-engaged with the city, setting up Stanton Street, an internet company combined with a short-lived alternative newspaper.

His political plans modelled around his ambitions for El Paso, which in the late 90 s was economically depressed and suffered by a brain drain of young people. O’Rourke forged a attachment with four friends who came to be known as the Progressives, one of whom, Veronica Escobar , now occupies the El Paso congressional seat evacuated by O’Rourke.

” What motivated him was the idea that El Paso didn’t have to settle for has become a low-key, down-at-heel city which was fine with exporting its offsprings ,” said Bob Moore, former editor of El Paso Times who has known O’Rourke since his return in 1998.

The Progressives’ ideals for their metropoli produced all four friends to stand for local bureau. All four won, with O’Rourke to intervene in the El Paso city council in 2005.

Moore recalls that in his political infancy O’Rourke section a paradoxically diffident flesh for a human now rivalling for the White House.” By sort he’s a deep private being. He was very awkward when he firstly passed for role, unpleasant in huge radicals. Then he “ve learned” to take power from gangs, and that has changed him .”

Despite such initial reticence, O’Rourke endorse some radical and highly contentious justifications. He became a passionate advocate of legalization of marijuana long before it was de rigueur, authoring a journal with fellow Progressive Susie Byrd, Dealing Death And Drugs, that insisted powerfully that the US war on medicines was a disaster for the two sides of the US-Mexican border.

He too fought to extend health benefits to unmarried and same-sex partnership with city workers, then a hot potato in heavily Catholic El Paso.

You will hear O’Rourke projecting his track record on marijuanas and LGBT claims on the presidential campaign trail. You are much less likely to catch any reference to a third controversy that steadfast him as city councilor, and still does to this day: the redevelopment of downtown El Paso.

The plan to revitalize downtown with a brand-new sports arena, Walmart and other facilities preceded O’Rourke’s time on the council, having been initiated in 2004. But he cuddled it keenly.

Beto
Beto O’Rourke steps with his wife, Amy Hoover Sanders, and his three children, Ulysses, Henry and Molly in El Paso on 6 November 2018. Photograph: Paul Ratje/ AFP/ Getty Images

His involvement became problematic for two main reasons. The first was his family ties to the mastermind behind the contrive, multi-millionaire real estate magnate William Sanders. Months after O’Rourke assembled the council, he married Amy Sanders and William Sanders became his father-in-law.

The downtown project was a private-public partnership. The private back involved a civic organization called the Paso del Norte Group, PDNG, which Sanders set up with some of his super-wealthy friends from El Paso.

Controversy erupted when it emerged that O’Rourke was also a member. Did his position, with one hoof in the private PDNG side of the cope and the other on the public council side, amount to a conflict of interest? He was slapped with an moralities complaint, later dismissed.

O’Rourke initially voted in the council to go ahead with the evolution project, but as local resist flourished he recused himself from several key referendums. Further cries of foul play condescended on him in 2012, when O’Rourke made an insurgent’s bid to oust the incumbent Congressman for El Paso, Silvestre Reyes.

A company owned by Sanders lent $40,000 to a Republican-backedSuper Pac that invested in attack ads against Reyes, contributing to O’Rourke’s underdog victory and passing him a leg-up to Washington.

In a recent interview with the American Prospect, O’Rourke repudiated any conflict relating to his father-in-law. Sanders” stimulated it a rule that he religiously followed, never to talk politics”, he said.

But the Sanders connection still irritates with activists opposed to the downtown scheme such as David Romo, a resulting member of the primary protest radical Paso del Sur. He said that O’Rourke’s connections to Sanders takes the glow off his current claim that as a presidential candidate he eschews big money and is running a ” people’s campaign “.

Romo told the Guardian that in his view O’Rourke’s role in the redevelopment directs doubts concerning his 2020 candidacy.” What have taken place in El Paso is said that the solution to our national problems does not come from a multi-millionaire funded by billionaires who does their bid .”

Romo is a celebrated historian of El Paso’s revolutionary past and as such is an articulate exponent of the second criticism leveled at O’Rourke over the redevelopment programme- that he surfaced with gentrification despite the impairment it would impose on good Latino residents and historic El Paso.” He was the jolly face of ugly gentrification .”

O’Rourke denies that he surfaced with gentrifiers, contending his intention was to breathe new life into the dilapidated mettle of a major municipality. He did tell the American Prospect, though, that in hindsight he accepts that he did” a really poor activity of like to hear that disapproval “.

‘He certainly does need to answer questions’

Similar controversy followed O’Rourke to Washington. Whether it originated from his innate pragmatism as a politician who tends to decide each topic as it comes rather than following ideology, or whether it was because of his beginnings in Texas, a state that has been dominated by Republicans for the past 20 times, his voting record in Congress was striking for the current lack of party purity.

Although El Paso strays overwhelmingly Democratic, a fivethirtyeight.com tracker indicates that he voted 30% of the time in accordance with Trump. Compare that to his presidential competitors: Kamala Harris( 17% ), Bernie Sanders( 14%) or Elizabeth Warren( 13% ).

That didn’t matter much in his senatorial hasten last-place November. But then he was running against Ted Cruz, one of the most toxic rightwing senators who even fellow Republicans announce ” Lucifer in the flesh “.

In that race he proved himself to have several of the qualities that might appeal to Democratic voters looking for a presidential campaigner capable of beating Trump, first and foremost his ability to turn out the vote. He depicted himself adept in plead to young person, African Americans, Latinos and suburban lily-white ladies- electoral groups all likely to play a crucial role in 2020 in deciding Trump’s fate.

But the road to the presidential nomination is proving to be a stonier path for O’Rourke than his road last year. By taking his expedition national he has moved on to much more fertile ground for a Democrat than the traditionally arid clay of Texas, yet it has come at the price of crisply intensified scrutiny.

Which delivers O’Rourke back to his climate change announcement amid the splendour of Yosemite Falls. Fossil fuel activists may have been agreeably surprised by O’Rourke’s robust program, but that doesn’t mean they have forgotten that his relationship with the oil industry has been complicated.

He paused for weeks before agreeing to sign the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge in which candidates forego all gifts above $200 from Pacs, lobbyists and executives of fossil fuel companies. The assurance was particularly sensitive for O’Rourke, who according to Open Secrets admitted more contributions from oil and gas in 2018 than any congressional candidate other than Ted Cruz.

He has said his hesitancy was out of concern for everyday proletarians in service industries who should be allowed to participate. The the organisers of the assurance nonetheless was also emphasized that only the donations of top superiors were excluded.

In the end, he did sign the pledge, two days after his Yosemite declaration.

Another sticking point is that O’Rourke voted twice in Congress to elevate a 40 -year ban on US exports of crude oil. He tried to justify the vote in October 2015, two months before the Paris Agreement on combating climate change was adopted by 195 nations, by arguing that US crude was cleaner than that of other nations and” the oil that affords the current dominant mode of transportation will have to come from somewhere “.

The lifting of the ban has led to a massive spike in US crude exportations, from well under 1m barrels per day to more than 3m per era currently.” There’s been a hazardous and problematic an increasing number of the extraction of crude oil driven by exports in the US. He really does need to answer questions about that referendum ,” David Turnbull of Oil Change US said.

It all points to the steep uphill climb that Beto O’Rourke faces if he is to claw his channel back into the Democratic spotlight. The Yosemite announcement made a solid start, acquainting American voters to a more serious, focused politician than they had previously been shown.

Now the real scramble begins.

The astonishing disappearing act of Beto O’Rourke

0

#Betomania became #Betofatigue in six short months can the Texas Democrat rise again and depict voters what type of president hed be?

When Beto O’Rourke travelled to Yosemite in California to unveil his $ 5tn plan on climate change, a ripple of astonish spanned America. How did the tall lily-white person with the funny first name known for his punk past, Beatnik road tours and fondness for campaigning atop counters get to be the first Democratic candidate to proclaim on the crisis of our age?

This wasn’t the O’Rourke that the country had grown used to during his battle with Ted Cruz last November for a US Senate seat. Then, the Texas Democrat had propelled himself to within three percentage points of succes, and with it national stardom, by making use of viral communications about NFL participates takinga knee and by instilling hope through a feel-good but instead wishy-washy call to unity.

Now here he was framed against the knockout of Yosemite Falls, delivering a granular plan of action worthy of the most nerdish policy wonk. Coming from a politician from oil-rich Texas who has been criticized for his track record on fossil fuels, his proposals for the largest 10 -year investment in history and a goal of net-zero releases by 2050 caught many off guard.

” We were pleasantly amazed ,” said David Turnbull of the climate advocacy group Oil Change US.” When you attend someone like Beto O’Rourke calling for the elimination of fossil fuel gives and an intention to fossil fuel leasing on public grounds- that’s moving in the right direction .”

There was another group of beings hoping to be agreeably surprised by the Yosemite announcement that day- O’Rourke himself and his unit of campaign consultants. They have been battling with one of the largest supernatural riddles of the early period of the 2020 presidential election.

That is: the astonishing disappearing act of Beto O’Rourke.

Beto
Beto O’Rourke listens to environmental proposes on 29 April 2019, in Yosemite national park, California. Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/ AP

Like Houdini, O’Rourke has started from front of stage to a inhale of cigarette in six short months. #Betomania morphed into #Betofatigue, seemingly overnight.

Look back on the events of 7 November 2018, when he delivered his franchise pronunciation, having lost to Cruz in a jam-packed sports stadium in El Paso, and you can see the oppose. At that time he was lauded as the politician who are likely do the hopeless: challenge a virulent Republican like Ted Cruz in a solid red territory like Texas and come within an inch of victory.

Next stop Donald Trump? But from the moment he launched his presidential bid in March, he has been struggling. Those exceedingly qualities that had been the recipe of his relative success in Texas unexpectedly became liabilities.

His charming directions and good looks were shed back in his face as grey privilege. That wasn’t helped when he demonstrated Vanity Fair a gift of a one-liner on the eve of open-” Man, I’m just endure are in conformity with it”- that obligated numerous Democrat wince.

The mere decision to run for the White House was interpreted as chutzpah. As the Daily Beast callously introduced it:” Reacting to losing to Ted Cruz by leading for president is like failing to land a role in a community theater production and deciding to take your endowments to Broadway .”

In the latest poll from Quinnipiac university, O’Rourke is gleaning a glum 5% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters. He is being outgunned on 10% by Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who has stolen much of his thunder.

” We’ve seen Mayor Pete take the lead in the newcomer district ,” said Quinnipiac’s Peter Brown who prophesied worse to come.” We’ve got 18 months to go and I gamble there will be other fresh faces taking the spotlight .”

So what happens next to O’Rourke now that the spotlight has fluctuated away from him? Can he accomplished the Houdini trick and make a reappearance? And if he was able to, what kind of potential president would he present to the American beings?

‘He was always exceedingly focused’

Examining those questions, it quickly becomes clear that all superhighways Beto lead to El Paso. That’s the dusty, sunbaked mete municipality in Texas where he was born Robert Francis O’Rourke in 1972.

His father, Pat, was a businessman and judge, and his mother, Melissa, flowed a furniture storage. They were comfortably off and organized part of the white-hot middle class elite in a city that is 80% Latino.

O’Rourke’s foes have tried to depict his youth as one of fecklessness and gluttony. Rightwing pundits like to poke him for the appoint “Beto”, claiming it is a conceit designed to suggest that he has Latino beginnings, which he does not.

They likewise point to a drunk-driving episode in 1998, his teenaged flirting with his punk stripe Foss and to the period when he struggled around in New York City working as a glorified maid. Reuters recently encouraged to that pile of potential negative assault textile with the revelation that O’Rourke had secretly belonged to the prominent “hactivist” group Cult of the Dead Cow.

But those who have known O’Rourke for years say they do not recognize this caricature of the spoil wild boy from the border town. Take Maggie Asfahani, a novelist and El Paso restaurateur, who had a teenaged tale with O’Rourke when he was at an all-male boarding school in Virginia.

Asfahani clearly recalls their first encounter in an El Paso mall when he was back on holiday. Her memory instantaneously introduces to rest any suggestion that ” Beto ” was an adult affectation.” I’d imagined this Mexican kid, given the name, but there was this really tall white guy. I can categorically dismiss all that speculation- he was’ Beto’ at least since I’ve known him in “schools ” .”

Asfahani can also, incidentally, put to rest any smutty talk about a much procreated picture of O’Rourke flanked by his Foss bandmates in which he wears a long floral dress.

” I was intended to put on the record, that is my dress he’s wearing ,” she said.” There’s nothing specially complicated about it- we were all hanging out, and someone thought it would be funny if we switched robes, girl children and guys. That was all, only being different .”

What struck Asfahani then as now was something that’s been lost amid the presidential chatter – his seriousness.” He was always exceedingly focused. He was this ferociously smart, strange person who was into things, always wanting to learn things, ever with a book in his hands .”

Asfahani remains in touch with O’Rourke to this day. She fantasizes the flak he has taken over unearned entitlement since he entered the 2020 race, based on her knowledge of the man, has been unfair.

” It strikes me he is finding his acces on the national stage ,” she said.” He’s being open and honest and vulnerable, hoping parties will relate to that and check themselves in it. That’s not a blame: it has been his personality since I’ve known him .”

‘He learned how to take force from crowds’

O’Rourke’s has entered into politics followed his return to El Paso, the prodigal son, at age 26. Having been largely away since his teens, he re-engaged with the city, setting up Stanton Street, an internet busines combined with a short-lived alternative newspaper.

His political impressions formed around his ambitions for El Paso, which in the late 90 s was economically depressed and suffering from a brain drain of young person. O’Rourke forged a bail with four friends who came to be known as the Progressives, one of whom, Veronica Escobar , now occupies the El Paso congressional sit evacuated by O’Rourke.

” What motivated him was the relevant recommendations that El Paso didn’t have to settle for being a low-key, down-at-heel city which was fine with exporting its juveniles ,” said Bob Moore, former editor of El Paso Times who has known O’Rourke since his return in 1998.

The Progressives’ ideals for their metropoli passed all four friends to stand for local bureau. All four won, with O’Rourke joining the El Paso city council in 2005.

Moore recalls that in his political infancy O’Rourke cut a paradoxically diffident chassis for a guy now emulating for the White House.” By sort he’s a profoundly private being. He was very awkward when he firstly moved for part, awkward in big groups. Then he “ve learned” to take energy from gatherings, and that has changed him .”

Despite such initial reticence, O’Rourke championed some progressive and highly contentious causes. He became a passionate advocate of legalization of marijuana long before it was de rigueur, authoring a work with fellow Progressive Susie Byrd, Dealing Death And Drugs, that debated powerfully that the US war on dopes was a disaster for both sides of the US-Mexican border.

He too fought to extend health benefits to unmarried and same-sex partnership with city workers, then a hot potato in heavily Catholic El Paso.

You will hear O’Rourke projecting his track record on marijuana and LGBT privileges on the presidential campaign trail. You are much less likely to catch any reference to a third controversy that unyielding him as city councilor, and still does to this day: the redevelopment of downtown El Paso.

The plan to revitalize downtown with a new sports arena, Walmart and other facilities preceded O’Rourke’s time on members of the security council, having been initiated in 2004. But he hugged it keenly.

Beto
Beto O’Rourke strolls with his wife, Amy Hoover Sanders, and his three children, Ulysses, Henry and Molly in El Paso on 6 November 2018. Photograph: Paul Ratje/ AFP/ Getty Images

His involvement became problematic for two main reasons. The first was his family ties to the mastermind behind the project, multi-millionaire real estate magnate William Sanders. Months after O’Rourke joined the council, he married Amy Sanders and William Sanders became his father-in-law.

The downtown project was a private-public partnership. The private area involved a civic organization called the Paso del Norte Group, PDNG, which Sanders set up with some of his super-wealthy friends from El Paso.

Controversy erupted when it emerged that O’Rourke was also a member. Did his position, with one foot in the private PDNG side of the transaction and another on the public council side, amount to a conflict of interest? He was slapped with an moralities complaint, later dismissed.

O’Rourke initially voted in the council to go ahead with the exploitation contrive, but as neighbourhood resist proliferated he recused himself from several key referendums. Further cries of foul play pitched on him in 2012, when O’Rourke made an insurgent’s bid to unseat the incumbent Congressman for El Paso, Silvestre Reyes.

A company owned by Sanders contributed $40,000 to a Republican-backedSuper Pac that invested in attack ads against Reyes, contributing to O’Rourke’s underdog victory and passing him a leg-up to Washington.

In a recent interrogation with the American Prospect, O’Rourke disavowed any conflict relating to his father-in-law. Sanders” prepared it the standard rules that he religiously followed, never to talk politics”, he said.

But the Sanders connection still irks with activists opposed to the downtown scheme such as David Romo, a extending is part of the main assert group Paso del Sur. He said that O’Rourke’s connections to Sanders takes the gleam off his current claim that as a presidential nominee he eschews big money and is running a ” people’s expedition “.

Romo told the Guardian that in his view O’Rourke’s role in the redevelopment throws doubt on his 2020 candidacy.” What happened in El Paso tells me that the solution to our national questions does not come from a multi-millionaire funded by billionaires who does their dictation .”

Romo is a celebrated historian of El Paso’s revolutionary past and as such is an articulate exponent of the second criticism leveled at O’Rourke over the redevelopment strategy- that he surfaced with gentrification despite the injure it would foist on poor Latino residents and historic El Paso.” He was the reasonably face of ugly gentrification .”

O’Rourke is denying that he sided with gentrifiers, insisting his intention was to breathe new life into the dilapidated middle of a major municipality. He did tell the American Prospect, though, that in hindsight he accepts that he did” a really poor place of like to hear that criticism “.

‘He truly does need to answer questions’

Similar controversy followed O’Rourke to Washington. Whether it originated from his innate pragmatism as a politician who tends to decide each edition as it comes rather than following ideology, or whether it was because of his beginnings in Texas, a state that has been dominated by Republicans for the past 20 years, his voting record in Congress was impressing for its lack of party purity.

Although El Paso strays overwhelmingly Democratic, a fivethirtyeight.com tracker indicates that he voted 30% of the time in accordance with Trump. Compare that to his presidential competitors: Kamala Harris( 17% ), Bernie Sanders( 14%) or Elizabeth Warren( 13% ).

That didn’t matter much in his senatorial race last November. But then he was running against Ted Cruz, one of the most toxic rightwing senators who even fellow Republicans announce ” Lucifer in the flesh “.

In that race he proved himself to have several of the qualities that might appeal to Democratic voters looking for a presidential nominee capable of beating Trump, first and foremost his ability to turn out the vote. He pictured himself adept in appeal to young person, African Americans, Latinos and suburban lily-white dames- electoral groups all likely to play a crucial role in 2020 for the purpose of determining Trump’s fate.

But the road to the presidential nomination is proving to be a stonier path for O’Rourke than his itinerary last year. By taking his campaign national he has moved on to much more fertile ground for a Democrat than the traditionally arid soil of Texas, yet it has come at the price of crisply intensified scrutiny.

Which makes O’Rourke back to his climate change announcement amid the splendor of Yosemite Falls. Fossil fuel activists may only be agreeably surprised by O’Rourke’s robust program, but that doesn’t mean they have forgotten that his relationship with the petroleum industry has been complicated.

He paused for weeks before agreeing to sign the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge in which candidates forego all donations above $200 from Pacs, lobbyists and executives of fossil fuel corporations. The assurance was particularly sensitive for O’Rourke, who according to Open Secrets accepted more contributions from oil and gas in 2018 than any congressional nominee other than Ted Cruz.

He has said his hesitancy was out of concern for ordinary workers in service industries who should be allowed to participate. The the organisers of the donate however was also emphasized that only the donations of top leaders were excluded.

In the end, he did sign the pledge, two days after his Yosemite declaration.

Another sticking point is that O’Rourke voted twice in Congress to hoist a 40 -year ban on US exports of crude oil. He tried to justify the vote in October 2015, two months before the Paris Agreement on combating climate change was adopted by 195 commonwealths, by arguing that US crude was cleaner than that of other countries and” the oil that equips the current dominant mode of transportation will have to come from somewhere “.

The lifting of the ban has led to a massive spike in US crude exports, from well under 1m barrels a day to more than 3m per date currently.” There’s been a hazardous and problematic an increasing number of the extraction of crude oil driven by exports in the US. He genuinely does need to answer questions about that referendum ,” David Turnbull of Oil Change US said.

It all points to the steep uphill climb that Beto O’Rourke faces if he is to claw his way back into the Democratic spotlight. The Yosemite announcement made a solid start, acquainting American voters to a more serious, focused politician than they had previously been shown.

Now the real scramble begins.

Tesla shares tumble amid $408 m loss and another high-profile departure

0

Losses come even as Elon Musks company says its delivering a record-breaking number of vehicles

Tesla shares toppled more than 11% in after hours trading on Wednesday after the company reported a larger-than-expected $408 m loss during the second one-quarter earnings, and announced the leaving of its manager engineering officer( CTO ).

Despite selling more automobiles than ever, Tesla is still struggling to prove it is profitable and has suffered a series of high-profile exits. JB Straubel, the CTO, will be replaced by the vice-president of technology, Drew Baglino, Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, announced on a announce with investors on Wednesday.

” This has nothing to do with lack of confidence for the company ,” Straubel said on the call.” I will be helping as I can, precisely no longer in an executive capacity .”

More than a dozen Tesla managers have started in the past year, including the vice-president of interior and exterior engineering Steve MacManus, the vice-president Peter Hochholdinger, and the European leader Jan Oehmicke in 2019. In 2018, Tesla lost Jon McNeill, the president of global marketings and business, Susan Repo, the corporate treasurer and vice-president of busines, and chief financial officer Deepak Ahuja, among others.

Tesla revealed in its quarterly earnings report an adjusted net loss of $ 1.12 per share, which was worse than the $0.31 loss expected. The company’s shares have dashed by more than 20% so far this year while the Standard& Poor’s 500 indicator has surged by 20%.

At an overall loss of $ 408 m, the second quarter loss were an improvement over an accidentally large loss of $702 m reported in quarter one. Tesla’s revenue climbed 47% from the same time last year to $5.2 bn. The firm also rendered $614 m in money during the quarter.

But specialists say the earnings are concerning.

” Overall, a bad report that will inevitably lead to more questions about its ability to stabilize and turn a profit ,” Clement Thibault, a senior specialist at financial markets scaffold Investing.com said.

On the label, Musk said Tesla expects to break even this quarter and make a profit by next quarter. He stressed that the company would center more aggressively on busines facilities in upcoming quarters. In part two, it opened 25 new service centers while facing complaints regarding patrons about assistance operations.

The losses in one-quarter twocome despiteTesla previously reporting it delivered a record-breaking 95,356 motor vehicles and created a record 87,048 vehicles, but specialists observed selling automobiles were not able to necessarily lead to profit. Former and current Tesla employees said they were forced to take shortcuts to meet these vigorous yield goals.

” Tesla struggles to fulfill its ambitious target and promises on a long-term basis, and stumbles at logistical deterrents despite massive advances in technology that stop both consumers and investors interested ,” said Alyssa Altman of the digital consultancy Publicis Sapient.” To avoid a total vehicle accident of the business in the next few years, Tesla needs to refocus its efforts from maintaining the look of a profitable and sustainable business model to actually delivering one .”

The lower-than-expected earnings also come after federal excise credits for Tesla vehicles were was reduced from $ 3,750 per vehicle to $1,875 after 30 June.

Musk has been hit by personal and professional gossips in the past year, including being fined and sanctioned by the US Securities and Exchange Commission for tweeting that he are projected to take the company private, and for later tweeting “inaccurate” informed about Tesla to his followers.

Miami Dolphins’ Kendrick Norton has arm amputated after car accident

0

Miami Dolphins defensive tackle Kendrick Norton has had his arm amputated after being involved in a car crash in the early hours of Thursday.

Miami Dolphins defensive tackle Kendrick Norton has had his arm amputated after a vehicle clang in the early hours of Thursday.

Florida police said the 22 -year-old’s Ford F2 50 nullified after stumbling a concrete railing. His injuries are not considered life-threatening but his agent, Malki Kawa, said the player had his arm amputated.

malki kawa (@ malkikawa)

With sadness, I can confirm that Kendrick Norton was in a car accident last-place nighttime and suffered multiple injuries, including the amputation of his arm. We expect that you continue to pray for him. Their own families too asks that the public respect Kendrick’s privacy.

July 4, 2019

” We were made aware this morning of a serious car accident involving Kendrick Norton ,” said a statement from the Dolphins.” Our thoughts and devotions are with Kendrick and their own families during this time .”

Norton was drafted by the Carolina Panthers in 2018 after starring for the University of Miami. He met the Dolphins last December and was contesting for a roster recognise this off-season.

Several Fatalities& Multiple Injured In Shooting At Florida High School — Suspect In Custody

0

UPDATE 9:07 P.M. EST: In another press conference Wednesday night, Sheriff Israel communicated the following: “Since we’ve last briefed, we’ve marked 12[ of 17 fatality] preys within the school. We will not be liberating their lists of any preys until every family and every mother is notified accordingly.” Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi was also present to let the press know the state will be paying for the burials of the victims and counseling for survivors.

UPDATE 6:26 P.M. EST: In a press conference Wednesday afternoon, the Broward County Sheriff demonstrated the authorities have 17 dead. He too approves the suspect is a 19 -year-old former student who was ostracized for disciplinary reasons.

UPDATE 6:17 P.M. EST: Broward County Public Schools Supt. Robert Runcie has confirmed fatalities, saying: “There are fatalities that are involved. We can’t confirm the amount at this phase. There are numerous fatalities. It’s a grisly situation. It’s just a horrible daytime for us.”

UPDATE 5:03 P.M. EST: Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel revealed in a press conference saying the crap-shooter was not a current student and that he was detected off-campus and taken into arrest without incident. According to African Lions Maul Suspected Poacher To Death

Student Michael Katz said he “heard what seemed like a scrap truck like banging” at the end of the school day. He recollects 😛 TAGEND

The school district exhausted a statement saying “dismissal, students and staff heard what clanged like gunfire, ” adding:

“The school immediately went on lockdown but is now dismissing students. We are receiving reports of possible multiple hurts. Law enforcement is on site.”

Officials have suggested locals to avoid the area.

On social media, images from inside and outside the high school have been liberated 😛 TAGEND

Fleeing Venezuelans face suspicion and hatred as movement crisis worsens

0

Ecuadorian border town struggling to cope with exodus driven by economic breakdown and political turmoil

Nicolas Maduro has defamed the hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans fleeing across the Andes as gullible” slaves and tramps” deceived into scour foreign toilets by foes of the Bolivarian revolution.

The United People said 2.3 million people, more than 7% of Venezuela’spopulation, have left the country since 2015, with most heading to Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Half a million have arrived this year in Ecuador alone.

But when Daniel Luquez, an unemployed carpenter, start out from his home in the city of Guanare in July he was not, as Venezuela’s president recently scoffed, chasing” the sugars” of “peoples lives” abroad. He was fighting for his daughter’s life.

Two-year-old Jolismar was diagnosed with thoracic cancer last year after physicians spotted a small lump near her nature. On Tuesday, and after an arduous three-week pilgrimage across Colombia, her papa arrived in the Ecuadorian border town of Tulcan determined to earn the money to support his ailing daughter as she experiences chemotherapy back in their rapidly undoing nation.

” Getting here was tough, but I have to battle for their own families ,” said Luquez, 27, who hitchhiked and hobbled nearly 1,200 miles to Ecuador. Six years ago his left leg was amputated as a result of a vehicle crash.

Daniel
Daniel Luquez, 27, toured 1,200 miles and is one of more than 500 000 people who have traversed into northern Ecuador this year. Photograph: Tom Phillips for the Guardian

Luquez is one of the more than 500,000 Venezuelans “whos had” swept into northern Ecuador via Colombia this year as his country’s migration crisis intensifies. Regional authorities struggle to cope with the humanitarian and political fallout from one of the largest mass movements in Latin American history.

The exodus appears to have accelerated in recent weeks with virtually 43,000 Venezuelans streaming into Tulcan over Rumichaca Bridge in the first 14 daylights of August alone.

Jose de la Fuente, the regional head of the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, said the number could smack 100,000 by the end of this month.” I don’t think anybody imagined a crisis of this sizing ,” he said.

Map 2

Andrea Obando, who is leading the humanitarian response for Tulcan’s town hall, said even 50 years of conflict involving Colombian paramilitaries and guerrillas had not pushed so many parties across the border.

Maduro, who came to power after Hugo Chavez’s death in 2013, has struck a insolent manner after the recent attempt to assassinate him, detaining political foes and vowing to revive Venezuela’s nosediving economy.

” I want the country to recover and I have the formula. Trust me ,” he said in a broadcasted address on Friday, announcing a major money reduction numerous economists say will stir the situation even worse.

Crowds
Crowds of Venezuelan migrants wait to cross into Ecuador on the Rumichaca bridge. Photograph: Tom Phillips Latin America correspondent for the Guardian

But with no indication of the economic or migratory junctures easing, Venezuela’s neighbours appear to be losing patience.

Brazil, which has taken in tens of thousands of Venezuelans, briefly sealed its northern border in early August, with regional experts claiming they could no longer cope.” If we carry on like this, by the end of its first year we will have lost ensure of the town ,” warned the mayor of Boa Vista, which is near the border.

On Saturday, angry Brazilians determined fire to migrant campsin the frontier city of Pacaraima and obliged about 1, 200 Venezuelan immigrants back over common bordersafter a restaurant owned was robbed and jabbed- supposedly by Venezuelans. The Venezuelan foreign ministry expressed concern over the attacks and insisted Brazil to protect the immigrants and their dimension. Brazil said it would mail extra units to the Roraima border to counter the unrest.

Earlier this year, Chile and Colombia introduced measures designed to deter Venezuelans from coming, and this week Ecuador and Peru followed suit, announcing they would only admit those with passports, something many shortage because of the commotion back home.

Ecuador’s decision was condemned by activists as unconstitutional and inhuman. But it will satisfy some in Tulcan, a picturesque but economically depressed settlement of about 60,000 inhabitants.

Hundreds of them paraded through its streets on Thursday, requiring urgent measures from President Lenin Moreno to rescue its economy and slow the influx of Venezuelans, some of whom can be seen sleeping bumpy and asking in commons and squares.

Hundreds
Hundreds of locals take to the streets of Tulcan, Ecuador to protest against the arrival of thousands of Venezuelan migrants. Photograph: Tom Phillips Latin America correspondent for the Guardian

” You are contributing to five, 10 or 20 Venezuelans but you can’t help … 10,000 ,” said Jairo Pozo, a business owner behind the complain, alleging” these Venezuelan gentlemen” of stealing Ecuadorian jobs and wallets.

Marco Sanchez, a 32 -year-old demonstrator, said he was disturbed by the presence of” this type of person”, claiming:” Fortunes of beings mostly come here come to steal .”

Obando said she was concerned about rising xenophobia and blamed local media for sensationalising a handful of offences committed by Venezuelans. Depriving incomers committed himself some petty crimes, she said, but added that official digits established lie to claims Tulcan was in the clutch of a crime wave.

She said Ecuador’s ” arbitrary ” decision to bar passport-less Venezuelans would strand numerous in Tulcan or push them into the mitts of parties smugglers. Permissions already knew of 25 smuggling ways around the town, she said: “This is going to skyrocket.”

That Venezuela’s exodus will continue is obvious from the tales of despair that bristle on Rumichaca Bridge, where thousands assemble each day en route to a new life and a Jehovah’s Witness volunteer has erected a signaling constituting the question on everyone’s mind:” When will the torment end ?”

Yemila
Yemila Urribarri, a 42 -year-old psychologist from Maracaibo who is fleeing to Peru with her 14 -year-old son, Jhoel. Photograph: Tom Phillips, Latin America correspondent for the Guardian

Yemila Urribarri, a 42 -year-old psychologist from Maracaibo who is fleeing to Peru with her 14 -year-old son, said her country was disintegrating.” There are children dying of hunger ,” she said, her attentions glazing over with tears.

AndresChacin, a 21 -year-old politics graduate who was Argentina-bound, said his generation had also lost hope:” Eighty per cent of my friends have already emigrated .”

With Maduro clinging on and Venezuela’s opposition subdivided, Chacin said he witness international pres as the only chance of change.” Vladimir Putin will be determined[ what happens ]. Xi Jinping will be determined. Latin American governments will decide. Nobody else ,” he said.

Others on the connection had most extreme suggestions.” There’s only one route to solve this: kill him- a missile on Miraflores ,” said Alex Ribero, a gold-miner from Ciudad Bolivar, referring to the presidential palace.

A group of backpackers from Germany and New Zealand ogled on in incredulity having unwittingly stumbled into the humanitarian emergency.” I’ve never been part of something like this … I had no meaning what we were going to be coming into ,” said Ashleigh Mcquarters, a 32 -year-old accountant who was among the crowd queuing to enter Ecuador.

Over coffee and cake , now unbelievable luxuries back home, Luquez withdrew starting his expedition in July with less than a dollar in his pocket. He crossed into Colombia at the town ofArauquita and initially planned to stay in Bogota . But he abandoned Colombia’s capital after being accosted by a neighbourhood inhabitant who told him ” venecos”, a derogatory statement for Venezuelans, were not welcome.

Daniel
Daniel Luquez in Tulcan. Photograph: Tom Phillips Latin America correspondent for the Guardian

On his crutches, Luquez hitched and hiked his path south through Cali, over Ecuador’s border and finally to Tulcan where he sells sweets on street corners from 7am to 7pm to help pay for his daughter’s treatment.

” It’s hard. You croak three or four periods without washing … and if you do take a bath it’s in a flow … I never believed I’d go through something like this. I never speculated I’d have to leave my own country ,” he said. “Never.”

That night Luquez retired to the shabby $50 -a-month hostel where he has leased a chamber with help from an international charity. He logged on to its wi-fi network and typed a message into his phone.

” My clas is the most important thing to me ,” it spoke.” You don’t know how much I bid they were here with me .”

Life And Debt: A Paralyzed Child And The GoFundMe Campaign That Launched A Charity

0

The last-place occasion Will Allen played baseball was Feb. 3. “His fathers” and coach, Tim Allen, sloped so Will, 7, and his Little League teammates have had an opportunity to some batting pattern. What happened on the ram home may impede Will from ever playing again.

Another car collided head-on with Tim’s truck. Tim gathered himself from the wreckage, but he immediately collapsed on the roadway. When he saw Will still caught inside, Tim believed he’d lost his youngest child.

“The look on his face and attentions is something that I will never remember, ” said Tim, 42, a banker who lives in Dripping Springs, Texas. “Then I hear him crying, so I knew he was alive.”

The worst didn’t happen, but Will sustained major spinal hurts and is now paralyzed below his chest. Will was hospitalized for two months and has been attending therapy since a few weeks after the accident. His brain hurts appear to have wholly healed, but his doctors give him only a slight fortune of ever walking again. While Tim suffered less serious injuries, he still needed surgery and spent eight days in the hospital.

Paralysis has been an especially heartbreaking diagnosis for a little boy who loves baseball, gym class and razzing dirt bikes with his big sister, Kyla, who is 8.

“There have been some times — very complicated minutes — where we’ve had real a discussion with him. Life doesn’t prepare you to have real, adult-like conversations with your 7-year-old, ” Tim said. “He’s had some instants where he will tell us that,’ I want to walk again. I want to be upright. I miss playing baseball.’”

This is how the Allen family joined the thousands of Americans parent fund via GoFundMe campaigns in order to alleviate the financial burden of lifesaving medical care. Will’s and Tim’s ambulance salvages, surgeries and hospital stands came at a high cost, the scope of which Tim doesn’t even know yet.

They will also need to pay for Will’s ongoing physical regiman, wheelchair and the other medical material he is necessary unless, against the stranges, he regains the ability to walk.

But unlike other families in this situation, Tim and his wife Shara, 38, aren’t worried that the costs will overwhelm them. “I have a good job. I have what I definitely sounds like is respectable policy, so far, ” he said. “We have an amazing network of family and friends and a community “whos just” been amazing.”

The GoFundMe campaign a family friend started for them has brought in more than $ 130,000 in subscriptions, and fundraising phenomena like a baseball tournament and a movie darknes at a neighbourhood distillery have generated even more money.

“The GoFundMe merely kind of blew up, ” Tim said. He has strong personal contacts in Austin and Houston, a town founded by his ancestors John Kirby Allen and Augustus Chapman Allen, and both he and his father work in banking. They know a lot of people who can afford to contribute.

Shara had left her vocation as an auditor several months before the car crash, granting Will a full-time caregiver and eliminating the need to hire costly in-home assistance.

Thinking about his family’s comparative approvals gave Tim an idea: Use the leftover GoFundMe money to seed a charity to help children with spinal line injuries whose pedigrees don’t have the same advantages. It’s a brand-new endeavor that’s just getting started, but Tim has large-scale a blueprint for the future.

“We’re going to be able to provide financial assistance, whether it’s help give medical invoices, helping pay for therapy that they can’t afford, helping categories that may not have insurance, helping kinfolks that have insurance but it’s not good insurance, ” Tim said.

Tim hopes eventually to devote himself full time to the WillPower Community Foundation, which he says is now his calling. “God was not ready to take us. There’s things to done here on Earth, ” Tim said.

“I rightfully definitely sounds like things happen for a conclude, ” he said. “It doesn’t make sense all the time why they happen, but I’ve been called to go help others through this terrible situation.”

Tim tries to emphasize the positive — for himself, and for his son, as he learns how to adapt to his new situation. “We don’t stay in those negative places very long, ” he said. “We rapidly redirect our focus to the positives in our lives.”

Will has become something of a local hero and even got to throw out the first tone at a Round Rock Express baseball game, the Houston Astros farm club, on WillPower Night on May 31.

Will has been working to strengthen his arms, neck and core muscles to help compensate for his paralysis and learn brand-new knowledge like transposing from his wheelchair into bed and back again.

“His spirit, persuasivenes and resolve is unmatched by anyone I’ve ever known in my life, ” Tim said. “He’s inspiring so many through what he’s doing. It’s been tough at times but we’re exceedingly sanctified to have him here, to have the functionality of his brain, his arms.”

The Facebook and Instagram pages for the WillPower Community Foundation are filled with photos and videos of their own families, with Will smiling in nearly all of them. Photos and times of Will at physical therapy show how hard-boiled he’s working to strengthen his arms, cervix and core muscles to help compensate for his paralysis and learn brand-new abilities like moving from his wheelchair into bed and back again.

“The doctors say that Will is going to be self-sufficient. Walking or not walking, he’s going to go on to live a extremely self-sufficient life, ” Tim said. “We are moving forward with the notion and to be expected that he is likely to be upright some date, and that’s what we work toward daily.”

Was Tiger Woods’s Masters win the greatest comeback in sport record? | Andy Bull

0

Sport is not short of great personal comebacks but Tiger Woodss Masters victory on Sunday may overshadow them all, including Muhammad Ali, Niki Lauda and Monica Seles

In the outpouring of 2014 Tiger Woods was at work on the stray around the back of his house, practising his short game like ever. Daytimes earlier he had shot a 78 on the final day of the Cadillac Championship, the worst fourth-round score of their own lives. His back had been spasming but he felt he had to get out and activity. He stroked a bust kill over a bunker and the time he had finished the shake he fell out flat on his back, overcome with a agony so severe that he could hardly breathe, let alone get back on his foot. He was out of hearing distance and he did not have his mobile phone on him, so there was nothing he could do but lie there and wait for someone to come.

It was his seven-year-old daughter, Sam, who found him.

“Daddy,” she said, what are you doing lying on the ground ?”

” Sam, thank goodness you’re here ,” he told her.” Can you go tell the people inside to try to get the cart out to help me back up ?”

“What’s wrong?”

” My back’s not doing very good .”

“Again?”

” Yes again, Sam, can you please run get those guys ?”

There are an awful mas of Lumbers floors but this one, which exist in the excellent biography Jeff Benedict and Armen Keteyian wrote last year, always seemed one of the most revealing because it speaks to the pain he has accepted, the dishonour he has suffered and the way in which it has all been laid out for the rest of us to see. Here is Groves, the great athlete, helpless as an upturned defect; Groves, the proud endorse, pleading with his kid to return someone who can get him back on his feet; Groves, a human so intensely private that he used to refuse to tell people where he would be playing the very next month, having that helplessness picked over in time detail by parties like me in print and on TV.

Quick guide

Tiger Woods since triumphing his last major

Tiger Woods has won his fifth Masters title and first major in 11 years after win in Augusta on Sunday.

It has been a long road back for the American, who has suffered numerous traumata and off-course problems.

Meltdown

On November 27, 2009 reports emerged that Timbers had been injured in a car accident near his Florida home after crashing with a fire hydrant and a tree. Over the next days and weeks the reasons behind the clang became clearer, He said he had “let his family down” with “transgressions” and announcing an indefinite break from golf. He lost major patronizes including Gatorade and Gillette over his revealings of multiple adulteries and he and his wife Elin Nordegren divorced.

Phoenix not rising

Woods , now determined to return to the pinnacle of golf following his self-imposed times in the wilderness, recorded the worst round of his busines in January 2015 as he filmed an 11 -over-par 82 in Arizona. His second-round performance at the Waste Management Phoenix Open left him 13 over and final in a 132 -man field. Lumbers told reporters subsequentlies: “It’s golf, we all have epoches like this.”

Don’t call it a comeback

In June 2016 he announced he was unable to compete at the US Open, the second largest major of its first year, following two back functionings in the space of six weeks. He culminated a 15 -month absence from video games in November but in January 2017 he missed the cut in his first PGA Tour event in virtually 18 months, departing the Farmers Insurance Open after finishing his first two rounds on four over par.

The master misses the Masters

The former nature number one was unable to contest the 2017 Masters. The chance to compete at Augusta 20 years since he first won the green casing was denied to Woods who continued to suffer from nerve pain which had involved three operations in the cavity of 19 months.

Under the influence ?

In a throwback to his indiscretions of autumn 2009, in May 2017 Lumbers was arrested on hunch of driving under the influence in the early hours of Memorial Day. He received a year of probation after pleading guilty to reckless driving and was ordered to undergo 50 hours of community service.

Victory again

In September 2018 Timbers killed a one-over 71 for a two-shot victory at the Tour Championship in Atlanta – the 80 th win of his PGA Tour career and his first in more than five years.

Thank you for your feedback.

There are plenty more. One could talk about those first frightful minutes in 2009 where reference is gate-crashed his SUV into a tree or the weeks after, when he closed over all the windows of his home with butcher’s article to keep the paparazzi cameras out. Or the private lunch at a Beverly Hills Country Club in 2016 when he had to walk up a flight of stairs backwards because it was the only way he could make it, or how, when he was arrested for driving under the influence in 2017, you are not able to even tell the police if he was in Florida or California, whether he was coming home or going from it.

On Monday morning the talk around Augusta and everywhere else they play golf was all about sweeter things, like how high this succes figured among Woods’s 15 majors and exactly where it graded among the great sporting comebacks. Now there is no easy response to that because one has to stack up hundreds of different accomplishments across dozens of separate epoches, which of course was precisely why everyone was chatting about it.

How do you assess what Woods did here against, say, the direction Niki Lauda finished runner-up in the F1 championship the same season he gate-crashed at the Nurburgring? Lauda was back hastening six weeks after he came out of coma. Or Mario Lemieux, who is heading the Pittsburgh Penguins to their first President’s Trophy in the very same season he finished his radioactivity care for Hodgkin’s lymphoma, while he had a back injury so severe he could not put on his own skates and roughly divulge Wayne Gretzky’s scoring record while he was at it? How does it compare with Lester Piggott winning the Breeders’ Cup Mile at the age of 54, only 10 daylights after he finished a year in prison for fiscal fraud? Or Monica Seles’s victory at the Australian Open in 1996, three years after she was stabbed in the back on tribunal in Hamburg?

Injury
Injury and personal troubles seemed to leave Tiger Woods a spent force by 2017. Photograph: Warren Little/ Getty Images

And all that is before one gets to the greatest of them all, Muhammad Ali, who won back the heavyweight championship seven years after he was deprived of it and had his boxing licence suspended because he refused to be drafted to fight in Vietnam.

Woods was reluctant to claim it was even the best comeback in his own sport. He points to Ben Hogan, who won the US Open a year and a half after he virtually died in a vehicle disintegrate. Hogan was hit by an oncoming bus. He hurled himself across his wife’s lap to protect her from the impact and, while she was uninjured, he suffered a broken pelvis, collarbone, ankle and ribs. They ameliorated again but he suffered with blood clots for the rest of his life and had to have emergency surgery. He was told he would never walk again and then he went on to win another six majors.

Quick guide

Follow Guardian sport on social media

Twitter : follow us at @guardian_sport Facebook : like our football and sport pages Instagram : our favourite photos, films and floors YouTube : subscribe to our football and sport channels

Photograph: Chesnot/ Getty Images Europe
Thank you for your feedback.

And hitherto, for all that, one can say this much: Woods’s tale is unique in one important space, unlike all those others, in that he did not suffer physically or personally but physically and personally. He has been tormented in figure and soul, his figure ended, his back smashed and fused back all going together, his reputation shredded and the bits and pieces strewn out for the rest of us to pick over. And here he was, sauntering off that 18 th light-green, Masters champion, with their own families around him, having place it all back together again.

” You never give up ,” says Lumbers.” That’s a made. You always crusaded. Precisely giving up’s never in the equation .”

Is anyone certainly hopeless to see Solo: A Star Wars Story?

0

The Han Solo prequel is one Star Wars movie we dont certainly need. No wonder enthusiasm tiers around it are unexceptional, to say the least

This week marks the liberate of a new Star Wars movie, focusing on arguably the most enjoyed reputation in its own history of the franchise- swashbuckling planetary bad-boy Han Solo. Everything about Solo: A Star Wars Story suggests it should be steaming into cinemas on the back of a thundering publicity study, but that’s not so. Compared with the fanatic fan anticipation that preceded The Force Awakens in 2015 and last year’s divisive The Last-place Jedi, the publicity build-up to Solo is subdued, like Chewbacca with a sore throat.

This is almost certainly, in part, a side effect of trepidation. Solo has been a deep disturbed movie throughout its creation, with rumours of on-set turmoil. Original filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller, best known for The Lego Movie, were deposed from their director’s chairs in June 2017, having spend six months filming. Ron Howard was brought in to ease the film over the finishing line and reports show he reshot much of the information that is. There were also concerns about Alden Ehrenreich‘s portrayal of Han Solo. Lucasfilm hired an acting coach to improve Ehrenreich’s performance, raising it more in line with Harrison Ford’s take on the character.

Personnel changes and a tempestuou behind-the-scenes story have shed gloom over the product. It immediately recalls the situation with Ant-Man, from which Edgar Wright stepped digression in 2014, more than a decade after he firstly wrote a medication. He was replaced by Peyton Reed and, when the cinema was secreted, a narrative soon emerged, with scant exhibit, that everyone is of the good things about the movie were the work of Wright, while all its bland Marvel cliches were down to Reed.

Watch the trailer for Solo: A Stars Wars Story

With Solo, the loathing operates deeper. Star Wars followers object to this movie on principle. Much of the debate around The Last Jedi revolved around Rian Johnson’s willingness to kill his favorites and make bold adaptations to the lore of the line. In a similar lane, followers consider Ford’s portraying of the roguish proscribe sacrosanct. To trade in Ford’s craggy visage for a younger simulate are tantamount of making the Millennium Falcon a trendy new cover place and an obtrusive backside spoiler.

Then there’s the issue of franchise fatigue. Solo arrives fewer than six months after The Last Jedi and is the fourth Star Wars movie in as many years, after a 10 -year wait before The Force Awakens. The originality and goodwill that helped The Force Awakens and, to a limited extent first spin-off Rogue One, has mostly faded to good-for-nothing- especially among love who considered The Last Jedi sacrilege.

There is no appetite for a brand-new Star Wars cinema so soon- particularly given the demographic make-up of the franchise’s love. The age of the original Star Wars anecdotes represents this succession skews older than current superhero undertakings. While the core teenage audience for the Marvel Cinematic Universe think nothing of watching three or four near-identical movies each year, that’s not true for their parents. For them, Solo: A Star Wars Story is not an episode. In that feel, Solo’s position is awkward. The film is too fraught with potential disgrace to appeal to its younger audience, who have followed its tumultuous creation online, and its early release could be seen as overkill by older love.

Donald
Donald Glover as Lando Calrissian in Solo: A Star Wars Story. Photograph: Jonathan Olley/ Lucasfilm

Since the Disney incarnation of Star Wars arrived here 2015, films from the franchise have the advantage vastly from a release during the holiday season- away from everything other than stray Harry Potter spin-offs and, in 2017, the amaze juggernaut of The Greatest Showman. There’s no such clear room for Solo, stood at the heart of summer blockbuster season- a few months after Avengers: Infinity War and exactly over a few weeks after Deadpool 2. Blockbuster-fatigued moviegoers, who have recently shelled out for two big-hearted movies, are not necessarily likely to open their purses yet again for a project that has a whiff of car-crash about it.

Solo will most likely be a decent-sized box-office success, and early re-examine intimate reported cases of its artistic death have been inflated. But there is a feeling that something has been lost. The handout of a brand-new Star Wars movie has long nursed a certain magic, as if the galaxy far, far away is the last place that retains the gleam of pure, unfiltered happening cinema. With Solo, that sheen is beginning to dull, as another of Ford’s most iconic movies would say, like rends in rain.