Another cop was placed on administrative leave with offer in the handcuffing of a Utah hospital nurse who refused to take blood from an unconscious patient.

Salt Lake City’s mayor and police chief apologized Friday to Utah Hospital nurse, Alex Wubbels, who is considered to be in mas cam video hollering “help me” after Detective Jeff Payne handcuffed and dragged her out of research hospitals over her refusal to take the blood sample from the patient, a car-crash victim, on July 26.

The video has caused outrage since it was released Thursday.

Payne was placed on paid leave and prosecutors on Friday announced a a criminal investigation.

Police supposed Friday a second polouse was likewise placed on paid leave. That patrolman has not has been officially determined, but officials have said they also were inspecting the conduct of Payne’s boss, a lieutenant that were allegedly called for the arrest if Wubbels kept interfering.

Mayor Jackie Biskupski said Friday she was alarmed at what the video demoes, according to The Salt Lake Tribune.

“What I met is completely unacceptable to the values of my disposal and of the values of the Salt Lake City Police Department, ” the mayor read, according to the paper. “I spread a personal justification to Ms. Wubbels for what she has been through for plainly doing her job.”

The video shows Wubbels, an Alpine skier who participated in the 1998 and 2002 Winter Olympics, calmly explaining to Payne why she could not draw blood from the patient.

She tells him that blood is simply be drawn if individual patients is conscious and establishes assent or is under arrest. Otherwise, she tells Payne she needs to see a warrant, citing a 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

Payne is then ascertained threatening to arrest Wubbels.

“I either go away with blood in vials or figure in haul, ” Payne is learnt saying.

Wubbels is then heard clarifying the situation to the bos. She tells Payne that her supervisor agrees with her and supposed to say to him, “Sir, you’re making a huge mistake because you’re menacing a nurse.”

With that, Payne is examined residence Wubbels under arrest and physically jostle her out the door as she screams.

The video appearances Wubbels yelling, “Help! Stop! I did nothing incorrect! ” while being handcuffed.

Payne was attempting to get a blood sample from William Gray, a modesty policeman in Rigby, Idaho, who was burned after to get involved in a head-on disintegrate with a pickup truck driver who was fleeing police, the Washington Post reported. The motorist been killed in the incident.

Payne wrote in a police report that he grabbed Wubbels and took her outside to avoid causing a “scene” in the emergency room. He said his boss told him to apprehend Wubbels if she kept interfering.

The detective left Wubbels in a red-hot squad car for 20 instants before realise that blood has indeed been drag as part of management, her solicitor, Karra Porter, read. Wubbels was secreted without being arrested.

Payne initially remained on duty although he was suspended from blood-draw duties.

Christina Judd, a spokesperson for the Salt Lake City Police, said the ministry was frightened by what they witnessed in the video.

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Judd said the department was working to investigate what went wrong and would also like to repair the “unfortunate rift” it had caused between detectives and nurses.

“I can’t sit on this video and not attempt to speak out both to re-educate and inform, ” Wubbels told The Salt Lake Tribune. Police departments “need to be having exchanges about what is appropriate intervention.”

Her heads have stood by her.

“University of Utah Health subscribes Nurse Wubbles and her decision to focus first and foremost on the care and well-being of her case, ” supposed Suzanne Winchester, the hospital’s media relations administrator. “She followed processes and protocols on such matters and was acting in her patient’s best interest. We have worked with our law enforcement partners on the above issues to ensure an adequate process for moving forward.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report .