From peril raspberries to stroppy peers, the road to EU divorce is littered with potential deterrents and drawbacks. Here are some of them

A IS FOR ASTRONAUTS

Space, the final frontier. As a contingency against Brexit extending horribly wrong, the governmental forces hopes to go where no government has gone before and seek out new worlds and new civilisations. Officials will be presenting a room industry legislation demonstrating them the power to permission spaceplanes and spaceports. So if he fails to secure the frictionless margins with the EU that he endeavours, Liam Fox can try his luck negotiating free trade agreements with extraterrestrials.

B IS FOR BORIS JOHNSON

Once and likely future pretender to the Tory crown whose prohibitions of interest in Mrs Mays swaying throne are strangely disbelieved by everyone. Some Boris-backers in his party “re saying that” their next ruler needs to be a Tory who campaigned for Brexit in order to influenced the Conservative states parties to swallow a less stark version of disavowal which prioritises protecting the economy. Johnsonphobes say no one in Europe takes him severely. They too point to a shambolic turn on the BBC last week. Under interrogation by the superb Eddie Mairof Radio 4s PM program, the foreign secretary registered a 10 on the internationally recognised Abbott scale of car accident interviews.

C IS FOR CITIZENS RIGHTS

The future status of EU citizens in Britain and Brits living in the EU27 is a key zone of contention in the opening conflicts of peace negotiations. Mrs May obliged what she called a bold and generous offering. The board sniffed that it was insufficient. Behind the posturing, both sides will be voting in favour of the imperative to reach an agreement conceding reciprocally recognised rights to the millions changed. That doesnt signify getting there will be easy.

D IS FOR DEEP( AND SPECIAL) RELATIONSHIP

What the government says it craves with the EU after the break-up. Darling, its me , not you. What the cabinet of ministers also suggested that she had with the Democratic Unionist party until it began bargaining over the cost of the support services in Westminster. The 10 Unionist MPs are very important in keeping the Tory minority government on the road and in knife-edge, Brexit-related votes in the Commons. The Unionists are already fume that the Tories are taking them for granted; the Tories are already harrumphing that the DUP is too greedy. This is a pointer to just how susceptible the government will be in parliament where it will be at risk of attack and defeat at all the stages of the Brexit process by combinations of Tory mavericks, opposition parties( attend Holyrood and Jeremy Corbyn) and stroppy peers( visualize Lords ).

E IS FOR EMERGENCY BRAKE

An idea for inhibiting immigration that David Cameron expended in his doomed attempt to prepare the EU more palatable to jive voters. The UK would be granted some dominance to curtail surges of in-migration while still retaining effective membership of the single grocery. Some Labour parties have promoted alternative solutions notion: migration to be restricted to those who have a enterprise furnish in Britain. The EU might involve this as an example of Britain trying to have its cake and eat it( Receive Boris ).

David
David Davis: the fight of the summer already appears to be over. Image: Emmanuel Dunand/ AFP/ Getty Images

F IS FOR FIGHT OF THE SUMMER

This is what David Davis, the Brexit secretary, had been promising us. Before last weeks opening of the formal bargaining, he predicted that the first strife would come over the EUs refusal to talk about trade until there had been sufficient progress on the UKs payment for its superb fund obligations. The negotations inaugurated with an immediate capitulation by the British back on this sequencing doubt, a withdraw which stressed a brutish point about the relative fortitude of the two sides. The UK need to see a treat more than the EU needs a deal.

G IS FOR GREAT REPEAL BILL

The central portion of eight Brexit-related items of legislation which the governmental forces hopes to get through assembly. The Great now appears to have been sagged from the proposals claim. It was always a misnomer. The legislation will repeal the European Communities Act of 1972 which took Britain into the then Common Market, while also translating all EU law into British rule so that it can be kept, amended or rubbed at afterward recreation. This legislation will present a multitude of the chance to the governments rivals to make trouble for ministers.

H IS FOR HOLYROOD

Home of the Scottish parliament and another potential spanner in the Brexit jobs. Under the Sewel convention, certain elements of Brexit legislation may require Holyroods approval. Scottish Patriots think that the Edinburgh parliament has a veto and threaten to wield it if limit of areas such as fisheries and farming are not devolved. Advocates have advised diplomats that it is not yet clear if this is the case. Nor do they seem sure what happens if Holyrood says no.

I IS FOR IRISH BORDER

Another key challenge for very early stages of the negotiations. Everyone agrees that it will be undesirable to have a hard-boiled borderlinebetween Northern Ireland and the Republic. This is a big concern for the Tories collaborators in the DUP. What no one seems to have satisfactorily determined hitherto is how the objective of which is can be made compatible with the governmental forces current form of Brexit which commits leaving the customs union.

Corbyn:
Corbyn: not currently keen on participating. Picture: Gareth Fuller/ PA

J IS FOR JEREMY CORBYN

With a minority Tory government embarked on such a momentous and fraught undertakes, the role of the opposition will be pivotal. Labours ambiguity about crucial aspects of Brexit helped it well during the election, when it managed to attract supporter from both Remain and Leave voters. This precarious organization will be tested by the fierce debates to come. Some Labour parties suggest that they would be willing to co-operate in trying to make a success of Brexit if the Tories moderated its own position. The signalings from the Labour leadership are that they arent very interested in any collaboration and “d rather” to continue efforts to hang Tory Brexit around the governments neck.

K IS FOR KAMIKAZE SCENARIO

The result of no divorce accordance. The UK would be released from all EU treaties. It would also have nothing to replace the thousands of international deals that flow from them. Philip Hammond, the chancellor, calls this a extremely, the worst outcome. Severe and widescale disturbance would thump businesses and consumers as tariffs are imposed and swap gums up at borders.

L IS FOR LORDS

Most peers are hostile to harder versions of Brexit and the government has no majority in the upper live. Under the Salisbury convention, peers will not resist a government when it is implementing manifesto programmes. The outage of the Tories to acquire a Commons majority stimulates it moot whether that applies.

M IS FOR MAY, MRS

In old-time Tory use, synonym for the brand-new Iron Lady, Gloriana, Boudicca and strong n stable. Rapidly redefined since she misplaced their majority at the election. In new Tory use, synonym for mayhem, moving dead, lame duck and weakened n wobbly.

N IS FOR NORWAY OPTION

Old idea caused brand-new life by the election result. In this soft form of Brexit, Britain repatriates some powersfrom Brussels, but retains membership of the European Economic Area and remains within the single marketplace for most meanings and purposes. The Cityand numerous businesses would like this, but it would require a prolonging fiscal contribution to the EU and the credence of most of its rules.

O IS FOR OPEN BREXIT

Favoured by the Tory leader in Scotland, Ruth Davidson. Another method of saying Soft Brexit. Just as Clean Brexit is really simply another way of saying Hard Brexit. See likewise A Red, White and Blue Brexit( T May ), A Workers Brexit( J Corbyn) and A Dogs Brexit( Ive just made that up ).

Ruth Davidson, like everyone else, has her own favourite Brexit. Picture: Lesley Martin/ PA

P IS FOR PAYING UP

Divorce is generally expensive. Appraisals of what the EU requires by way of a break-up fee rise to a net invoice of 75bn( 65.6 bn ). Ministers contend they will not cough out that summarize, but have not said what they might were in favour of. Just one cent will infuriate some Tories.

Q IS FOR QUEENS SPEECH

A budget version this year, with cut-down magnificence instead appropriate in the reduced circumstances in which the governmental forces procures itself. There wont be a Queens speech at all next year on the grounds that the government of canada is needs an unique double parliamentary session to get all the Brexit legislation through.

R IS FOR RASPBERRIES

and other soft fruits, which will cost up to 50% more after Brexit if tighter in-migration dominances foreclose seasonal workers coming into Britain to pick the grow. So warns British Summer Fruits, the industry torso. Stand by for complained about the price of strawberries and ointment when Brexit angst makes Wimbledon.

S IS FOR SABOTEURS

Abusive term of select in the Brextremist press to attack anyone with the temerity to mention the hindrances of hard Brexit. Mrs Mays referendum gambit was heralded as an opportunity to vanquish the vandal. That went well, didnt it?

T IS FOR TRANSITIONAL ARRANGEMENT

Regarded by the Treasury and many others as vital in order to minimise the financial disruption of Brexit, this would mean that Britain only slowly untangled itself from many aspects of the EU. Transitional arrangements can turn into permanent ones, which is why the notion is viewed with narrow-eyed hunch by many hard Brexiters.

U IS FOR UKIP

The plum-and-custard brigade were obliterated at such elections, but Ukip could restore on the back of voters indignation by a diluted, delayed or ditched Brexit. Nigel Farage has hinted that he might be up for a third tour or would that be fourth?

V IS FOR VOTERS

Bloody voters. The electorate is ultimately held accountable for casting Britain adrift in an ocean of uncertainty. Voters narrowly chose to instruct politicians to take Britain out of the EU in the 2016 referendum. Then the country to be given Mrs May a mandate to prosecute her type of Brexit while producing a parliament without any clear consensus for any other form. Bloody voters.

A
Voters: who asked them? Photograph: Rui Vieira/ PA

W IS FOR WORLD TRADE ORGANISATION

In the event of Britain differing with no spate on swap, we were able to default to the rules set by the World Trade Organisation. Hard Brexiters argue that this would not be so terrible. Many ventures say it would signify a nightmare as tariffs and non-tariff barriers were made between UK and EU trade.

X IS FOR KISSES

still being blown across the Channel from some on the continent. Donald Tusk, chairman of the European Council, recently voiced the hope that Britain might change its subconsciou. The election result has emboldened some British Remainers to feel the duel is not over hitherto. Breversal would require a decided shift in public opinion and a government willing to hold a second referendum and able to acquire it in order to invalidate the result of the first.

Y IS FOR YOUTH

The pro-Remain young were overwhelmed by the pro-Leave old in the referendum. Many young voters have said that their wrath invigorated them to attempt their avengeon the Tories in the recent election. What travels around comes around.

Z IS FOR ZERO HOUR

That would be 29 March 2019, when the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, deal or no bargain. If there is an agreement, it will need to be wrapped up by the end of 2018 to leave era for permission by EU states and the European parliament elections. An postponement is possible, but would require the unanimous assent of the EU 27. Time is not Britains friend. So thank goodness we have such a strong and stable government.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here