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Eniko Parrish Gets Candid About Kevin Hart’s Cheating Scandal& Why She Took Him Back: ‘I Believe In Second Chances’ – Perez Hilton

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Eniko Parrish is shedding the tea about that time Kevin Hart majorly f ** ked up by “feel like i m cheating on” her with other women!

The mother-of-one broke down in tears while recounting the

In the series’ third episode, titled What Happened in Vegas , Parrish excused she found out about the headline-making video thanks to an anonymous DM on social media, sharing 😛 TAGEND

“How I found out was a DM. I don’t know who it was. They transported me an edited video of Kevin and, you are well aware, another woman.”

The timing couldn’t have been worse, either, as the 35 -year-old model was eight months pregnant with the couple’s son Kenzo when she received the news.

She remembered 😛 TAGEND

“I was pregnant at that time, I was about seven or eight months pregnant. I was having breakfast, I opened my phone and immediately I just lost it. I called him, I’m crying, I’m like pissed. Right then there are still, I obstructed saying,’ How the f ** k did you let that happen? ’”

She went on to recall saying to her hubby 😛 TAGEND

“You publicly humiliated me. Your whole everything’s on Instagram, everything’s on social media. It was an ongoing fight all the time. Every single day. I impeded questioning him, like,’ If this is what you’re gonna do, I don’t want to be a part of that.’”

As heartbroken as she was at the time, however, Eniko said she’s “happy” everything happened, illustrating 😛 TAGEND

“I’m happy that it kind of happened. I get sensitive every time I talking about here. He’s f ** ked up, this was a bad one, this was major. Nine times and I remember would like to congratulate, it’ll be better.”

We can only hope!

As for Hart, he was indicated in the occurrence that “the toughest thing” about the agony was “just telling my wife, ” musing 😛 TAGEND

“That conversation, it is not possible to easy lane to have that exchange. The worst segment was just knowing how you made somebody feel. There’s a major consequence it could have on the people that you are closest to, who you affection the most. When I got to see that first-hand with Eniko when I got to see the effect my reckless behavior had … It was subduing, that tore me up. That truly tore me up.”

Yeah, it must have been so awful for you, Kev.

He continued 😛 TAGEND

“That’s probably the lowest moment of “peoples lives” because I know what I was responsible for. When it happened it came at such a f ** k up day. We were in the middle of the tour … and residence wasn’t home. Home was cold. In that instant, you gotta have something to lean on, something to help you stand up straight.”

Luckily for Hart, Parrish chose to stay in the relationship, explaining that she “kept worrying about” their then-unborn son.

She clarified 😛 TAGEND

“I have to maintain a level leader, I think that’s the only thing that really got me through. I wasn’t ready at the time to only give up on my family. I craved Kenzo to be able to know his dad and growing quite, so it was a lot.”

Wiping away tears, she continued 😛 TAGEND

“It was a lot for me, but we’ve been through it, we’ve gone through it, we extended it and he’s a better husband now because of it … I think it is second chances.”

But that doesn’t mean she’ll stop forgiving over and over again 😛 TAGEND

“I’m all about forgiveness, and you simply get two times. Three strikes you’re out, you’re out of here. So, as long as he reacts, we’re good.”

Fingers intersected!

Do U envision Eniko was wise to give her faithless hubby a second chance ??

[ Image via Netflix/ WENN ]

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Ruler Harry Reveals He’s Been In Therapy For 3 Times – And Megxit Was To Protect Archie From His Childhood Trauma – Perez Hilton

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Just a few cases weeks ago we were wondering if Prince Harry was already having Megxit regregxit. Sorry, Megxit bitterness .

Word has it

The couple both spoke at the Alternative Investment Summit in Miami Florida( long way from Toronto, am wondering why they flew ?), and according to a source who was there Harry was completely candid — even disclose something he’s never said before 😛 TAGEND

He’s been in therapy for the past three years.

Apparently the couple were introduced at the summit, which was was supported by JP Morgan , by their good friend Gayle King . Meghan spoke firstly, saying lovely things about her husband before raising him up to speak. The witness communicated to Page Six 😛 TAGEND

” Harry spoke about mental health and how he has been in therapy for the past three years to try to overcome the trauma of losing his mother .”

As you probably know, Harry’s mother, Diana, Princess of Wales , was killed in a high speed car crash in the Pont de l’Alma tunnel in Paris as her motorist tried to evade paparazzi trying to get a shot of the far-famed Royal. The quality of the accident was the subject of much contention and investigation for years afterward.

Harry was only 12 years old.

Sebastian Thrun:’ The cost of the air taxi system could be less than an Uber’

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The Google X founder on flying taxis, the healthcare employs for AI and why we havent seen the last of Google Glass

Sebastian Thrun isn’t your ordinary Silicon Valley computer geek -cum -Stanford professor. The 51 -year-old artificial intelligence and robotics scientist is responsible for co-developing Google Street View , pioneering self-driving cars, founding Google X the internet giant’s secretive research lab- and revolutioni sing education by kickstarting massive open online courses ( M oocs ). His most recent project is developing flying autoes. You launched your flying automobile corporation, Kitty Hawk , in 2015 backed by Google co-founder Larry Page and you have two projects in development- a personal aircraft announced Flyer and an autonomous air taxi called Cora . Why do we need flying cars?
The ground is getting more and more congested- we are all stuck in traffic all the time. Bringing transportation into the air will obligate things faster, safer and more economically and environmentally friendly. Just imagine tour at 80 miles an hour in a straight line at any time of day without ever having to stop. If you’re in Jersey City in the morning and wish to go to Times Square, Manhattan, that might take you more than an hour in traffic. With an electric flying vehicle you have been able do it in less than two minutes on perhaps 10 pennies of energy costs. It “wouldve been” transformational to almost every person I know.

So information and communication technologies is there?
I believe so. Cora and Flyer are both examples that have shown that it is possible to take parties in the air for about 20 minutes at a time with the reach of maybe 50 or so miles[ Cora is being tested on New Zealand’s South Island ]. That is sufficient in my opinion for most of our daily excursions to and from work, academy, the supermarket and so on. It’s a matter now of finishing up and making them to marketplace. I think in the next three to five years we’ll appreciate a lot of change.

the
Kitty Hawk’s Cora aircraft in flight.
What about safe. Would you put one of your family members in one of these flying autoes ?
I’ve flown it, my partner has flown it and my son who is 10 has not yet flown it but he wants to. Obviously safety is our No 1 concern and we’ve been working closely with regulators. At this item, Flyer is only controlled 10 ft above a liquid face made to ensure that, in the absolute worst case, a person can take a water land. But as information and communication technologies full-growns, it ought to be safer than even existing small-scale aircraft. That’s because the propulsion organization uses many different independent engines and propellers: if “were losing” one it’s not a big deal.

Sky jammed with personal aircraft will probably irk a lot of beings. And isn’t it a recipe for chaos?
I would concur that societal credence is perhaps the biggest unknown for us. We are very sensitive to parts such as noise. People worry about air congestion, and so do I, but in the air, unlike on the dirt, vehicles can fly at different altitudes. You can always fly a little higher or a little lower to avoid congestion. Nonetheless, there is an important challenge to build an air management system that can accommodate maybe tens of thousands of vehicles at a time.

Won’t these things just be brought to an end being merely for the rich?
Part of our dream at Kitty Hawk is to build a taxi system which could democratise information and communication technologies from day one so everybody gets to use it. We believe that the costs of the air taxi system would be even less than the cost of an Uber or a
Lyft.

You won a 2005 grand challenge from the Pentagon’s study organization, Darpa , to create a driverless vehicle. That contributed “youre going to” spotted Google’s self-driving car team , now a company called Waymo . What’s your assessment of how the field is progressing?
I am an impatient person by nature. I would love self-driving cars to take over the world right now. If you take a ride specifically in a Waymo car today, the technology is basically ready. The regulators have been amazingly cooperative in espouse this new vision. The real challenge ought to have clients chose it. We are in the very early phase with that.

In March this year a woman pushing a bicycle across the road was strike and killed by a self-driving Uber vehicle in Phoenix, Arizona , generating Uber to suspend testing in the city. How much of a setback has the demise been for autonomous vehicles, generally? Is it inescapable that people will die as this new technology ripens?
The Waymo team has now successfully driven over 5m miles. In all those miles, a application hitch stimulated exactly one minor collision. Almost all traffic accidents are the result of lack of attention and distraction. The Waymo car never texts, it never sleeps, it is never drunk, it never fails to pay attention and it even looks in all directions all the time. As a ensue, it ought to be that we can eventually cut the number of traffic extinctions by a factor of 10 or more, and even possibly down to zero.

You’re a lament cyclist. How perturbed are you about the impact of autonomous vehicles on cycling? Are the systems sophisticated enough to monitor and is submitted in response to unpredictable practice?
When I moved the Google team we very actively worked on predicting the behaviour of and interacting with bicyclists, small children, deer and other seemingly unpredictable elements of real congestion. A self-driving car has enormous precision. It reads even the smallest amount of action. As a cyclist who has been exposed to danger many times by trucks passing at less than an inch permission, I can’t wait for cycling among self-driving cars because it will be safer than it has ever been.

You’ve worked on applying AI to healthcare. What will it do for us?
We found that a well-trained neural network combined with a smartphone is as accurate as the best human experts at spotting surface cancer. That makes it possible to take the expertise of the best doctors and threw it into the hands of everybody. It’s still early. But I have this dream that if we just rethought diagnostics as something that happens every day for every person at home we might be able to diagnose all sorts of diseases that are life-threatening before it is too late.

In 2011, you co-founded the online technology education house, Udacity , to offer M oocs after the success of a Stanford AI course you ranged online. Later you left Google to focus on it. Initially there was exuberance with M oocs then disillusionment, with the New York Times declaring in 2013 that Udacity was a flop. Where do things stand today?
I don’t think Udacity has been a flop at all. It is just that it takes probably a decade or more to get to the point where we can really move the needle on educating a large number of beings. Since 2011, we have really learned how to become the medium successful. We received information that students adoration parish and one-on-one mentorship. Back in the working day, our finishing rates were typically 3-5 %. Today, our finishing paces have been as high as 60 -7 0% in some of our nanodegree programs[ which accusation players a cost of generally about $1,000 ]. Globally around 10 million people have registered and in any dedicated month “were having” approximately 50,000 paying students signed off for a nanodegree. We would be profitable but we reinvest our costs back into innovation. And parties are being hired out of these courses. We are the biggest supplier of aptitude in red-hot topics like self-driving cars and deep read. We educate more students self-driving car technology than all the universities in the world combined.

Is there a sci-fi book or cinema you’ve raided for minds?
To get notions I just look at what bothers me. Why am I stuck in traffic every day? Why did my sister die of breast cancer if it can easily be diagnosed? All these problems have mixtures. There’s a lot of opportunity for innovation in so many aspects of everyday life.

sebastian
Sebastian Thrun wearing Google Glass at the TechCrunch conference in San Francisco, 2013. Photograph: David Paul Morris/ Bloomberg via Getty Images

You are two of the experts interviewed in the documentary Do You Trust This Computer ? which has just been released in the US and alarms about the potential dangers of artificial intelligence. What scares you?
My biggest fear is that beings race to premature arbitration. New technologies have always been scary. A hundred years ago people dreaded high-voltage electricity in their homes. Today we have become dependent on it. What we need is an open and wide-reaching communication on how to best leverage this new technology. I believe this is taking place today.

When it comes to manufacturing the world a better place, is Silicon Valley delivering?
Yes. Not everything is perfect, but consider the value added to society through the onset of smartphones, social networks, and free online education through Udacity. Udacity educates numerous millions of students in the world. It stirs high-quality education accessible everywhere. And self-driving cars might at some place save more than a million lives every year. These are large-scale things.

From patrolling to access to finance, AI is being increasingly used to make decisions that can change people’s lives. Radicals like the American Civil Liberties Union say there is a danger that the gender issues and ethnic biases we have already will get knitted in. How do we work better?
We should pay attention to this and understand whether the machines we develop are inappropriately biased or lead to bad decisions. I am a big fan of people and machines working together in decision making, with parties having the eventual the authorities concerned establish life-changing decisions. I am much less a fan of leaving such decisions to machines , no matter how good AI has become.

Google Glass emerged out of Google X but was then discontinued in 2015. Where did it go wrong? Are you sad that Google’s face computer didn’t get off the ground?
We launched Google Glass too early- before “were having” figured out the exact use case and built a functioning user interface. While I’m sad that Google Glass wasn’t a smashing success in its first place, I am optimistic about what’s happening today. Google Glass is alive again, this time more focused on workplace use. Doctors are using it in patient care and it’s even being used in agriculture. I am certain it will come back.

You were working on a project designed revolutionise home cooking. How is that exiting?
This was just a pastime and it’s cancelled. We fabricated a technique in which you could make a freshly cooked perfect dinner in less than three and a half minutes. We registered a few patents, we ingest a lot of food. But at the same time, flowing Udacity and Kitty Hawk was enough of a workload for me. As an entrepreneur you play with a thousand suggestions, you develop a hundred, you like 10 and then you eventually do one.

What’s your holy grail of fabrications?
I would love to instantly interface my brain to all the computers in the world, so I could be truly superhuman. I would know everything- every name, every phone number, every information- and I would be born speaking every language and with the full wise of my parents and forebears.

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Norway and the -Aha moment that moved electric cars the answer

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A country fuelled by hydropower has become the worlds electrical vehicle leader

In 1995, the lead singer of the 1980 s strip -Aha and the head of the Norwegian environmental group Bellona clambered improbably into a converted electrical Fiat Panda they had imported from Switzerland and set off on a road trip.

They drove around Oslo refusing to pay the city’s sky-high road fees, parking illegally wherever they could, and dismissing every disadvantage notice they were given. Eventually, the authorities confiscated their vehicle and auctioned it off to cover the fines.

But the stunt attracted massive media attention, and the point was became. Soon after, electric vehicles were exempted from road tolls, one of a large raft of motivations that have, over the years, facilitated realise Norway the country with the world’s highest per capita electric vehicle ownership.

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Last month, in an economy hit by the coronavirus crisis, fully electric cars to be taken into consideration simply under 60% of Norway’s brand-new automobile marketplace, and plug-in hybrids merely over 15%- signify three in four of all new vehicles sold were either wholly or partially electric.

It still has some practice to go, but “the two countries ” examinations on track to meet a government target- set in 2016, with full cross-party parliamentary support- of phasing out the sale of all new fossil-fuel based cars and light-headed commercial vehicles by 2025.

” It’s actually quite amazing how quickly the mindset’s changed ,” said Christina Bu of the Norwegian EV Electric Vehicle Association.” Even in 2013 or 2014, parties were sceptical. Now, majority decisions of Norwegians will say: my next gondola will be electric .”

The story of how and why that has happened has a straightforward, if unexpected logic. First, despite has become a major oil and gas producer, virtually all of Norway’s domestic vitality comes from a single, and renewable, source: hydropower.

That intends swapping to EVs is a much greener option for Norway than for countries whose power is generated chiefly by coal flowers- and that if it wants to significantly reduce its emission degrees, it has little choice but to dark-green its transport sector.

Driven by the environmental imperative, the government began offering incentives to buy and range electric cars as far back as 1990, first by introducing a temporary exemption from Norway’s exorbitant vehicle purchase tax, which became permanent six years later.

” This was an important step ,” Bu said.” Norway was a very poor country before we discovered petroleum; vehicles were a indulgence piece. They’ve always been charged very highly. Cars in Norway are a lot more expensive than elsewhere. Without the acquisition imposition, the cost of an electric car basically fell to that of an everyday vehicle .”

Since then, electric car operators have been given the right to park free of charge in some municipal parking lot, drive in bus trails, take shuttles without air tickets and, thanks to -Aha, drive toll-free. They are not required to pay VAT on their autoes, or road excise, and companionship electric cars are taxed at a lower charge than petrol or diesel vehicles.

Some measures have changed over the years: to be allowed to drive in a bus road, for example, you now need to be carrying air passengers. A so-called 50% convention was introduced in 2017, allowing local authorities to charge EV motorists up to 50% of the parking costs, street fees and ferry proportions be applied to fossil-fuel vehicles.

But overall, said Bu, the” combining of a big one-off saving when you buy the car, plus the substantially lower costs- gasoline, tolls, parking, maintenance- of actually driving it, still adds up to a very powerful financial debate. Over its lifetime, “youve been” save a great deal of money with an electric car in Norway .”

That was certainly what persuaded Wenche Charlotte Egelund, 57, who purchased a VW Golf Electric with her partner two years ago when they moved out of central Oslo.” The incentives is of paramount importance ,” she said.” The taxation and VAT exemptions, free municipal parking, free toll roads that means that we are avoid the rush-hour traffic jams .”

EV
EV charging stations at Kongens Gate near Akershus Festning in Oslo. Photograph: Bloomberg via Getty Images

In fact, Egelund said, the incentives were so significant that she nearly” felt the decision was imposed on me. Financially, it was like there was no other sensible alternative. I do wonder whether it really is as green as we are told. Is a auto ranging on clean diesel truly worse than the environmental impact of producing an EV battery ?”

Rachel Ritman, 56, a postwoman living on the outskirts of Fredrikstad, bought her Opel Ampera two years ago and said she has not regretted her alternative, even if she was ” not sure we would have gone electric without the incentives “. The car’s wander was good, she said: 250 miles( 400 km) in summer, 200 miles( 320 km) in winter and because she accuses at home she does not suffer from ” lade-angst”, or the fear of running out of juice.

Both Ritman and Egelund have a second, diesel-powered car for extra-long tours, to country cabins or vacations. Sten Brathen, 55, a media consultant, bought his Nissan Leaf as a second car” for taking the children around and driving to work. But there were so many advantages that when we were getting a new central auto last year we didn’t think twice about moving electrical .”

Government motivations is of crucial importance in the decision to buy, Brathen said:” I think we would have managed without the other motivations- free toll roads and parking- but the actual cost of buying was so much lower than ordinary cars here in Norway .” He counselled, though, that Norway was going to need more accusing stations.

Despite the incentives, EV sales in Norway remained low until about 2010, when a number of smaller, more cheap electric cars from makes such as Mitsubishi and Nissan came to market, and improved technology represented large electric cars began to offer both the cavity and range to acquire them a sensible option for families.

Bu said the incentives were so significant that” many people say they’ve purchase the most expensive car they’ve ever had when they buy electrical- Teslas, Jaguars, that kind of model- simply because they’ve calculated what kind of saving they’re going to be make-up over the coming years, and feel better attains gumption “.

That has led to accusations that Norway’s encouragement of electrical vehicles amounts to little more than tax slashes for the rich, or a cut-price second automobile. Numerous Norwegians on lower incomes can only dream of owning an electric car, and three out of four auto buys are on the secondhand market.

Bu- whose organisation represents shoppers rather than producers- accepted this, is considered that” we have to change the cars we drive, and the only way to do that is to change the brand-new cars. We can’t convert used ones “. EVs will soon make up 10% of Norway’s fare fleet, she said, and are slowly coming on to the used market.

She said she was confident for the future of electric vehicles, even in countries without a big renewable ability sphere, and studies show that EVs direct on strength generated from fossil fuel are responsible for roughly the same level of overall CO 2 radiations as petrol cars.

” As national societies, we clearly have to do two things ,” she said.” Produce more renewables and produces- like cars- that can run on it ,” she said.” We have to do both, as swiftly as possible. We can’t hang around until we’re raise 100% renewable energy resources .”

Electric automobiles are” never going to be truly environmentally friendly”, Bu said.” The main difficulty is constructing the artilleries. We need clean artillery creators in Europe. But look, we need transport. We need automobiles and vans, especially outside our metropolitans. And for us, electrical is the answer .”

This story shall form part of Covering Climate Now’s week of coverage focused on Climate Solutions, to distinguish the 50 th anniversary of Earth Day. The Guardian is the lead partner in Covering Climate Now, a world-wide journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate fib .

Googles New Shoe Insole Analyzes Your Soccer Moves

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Jacquard started out as a sensor on a denim jacket, where specifically woven textile on the sleeve told the wearer see acts on their telephone by brush the fabric. Swipe a palm up the sleeve to change music tracks, swipe down to call an Uber. A double-tap during a bike trip would send an ETA to a duo of headphones.

But Google &# x27; s wearable sensor engineering is evolving beyond only taps and swipes. The Jacquard sensor, called the Tag, can now be installed into the insole of a shoe, where it can automatically distinguish a series of physical flows. In its first implementation, it will track the usual gestures beings attain when playing football( the sport Americans bellow football) like kicking, operating, stopping, and accelerating again.

It &# x27; s just the latest incursion into ambient computing from Google &# x27; s Advanced Technology and Project( ATAP) team, the tribes behind Jacquard. I spoke to the team about how the Tag &# x27; s brand-new mechanics cultivate and what all countries of the world will look like formerly the computers around us can sense our attendance and present us what we need before we even know to ask for it.

From Jacket to Shoe

Jacquard was an experimental project, announced at Google &# x27; s developer discussion in 2015. Two year later, the team debuted the tech in a Levi &# x27; s denim coat. The Tag is the computer, altering up to three touch gesticulates built on the case &# x27; s sleeve into customizable actions on a smartphone–ideal for people who commute by bicycle or scooter who can &# x27; t pull out telephone calls while riding.

Fast-forward to 2019 when Google unveiled Jacquard 2.0, a smaller Tag that went inside more forms of Levi &# x27; s jean jackets( including information that expenditure little ), as well as a knapsack from Yves Saint Laurent. This same tag can now be plopped into a $40 insole made by Adidas called GMR( declared “gamer” ), who are able to placed into any soccer shoe, Adidas or not.

It all ties into EA Sports &# x27; FIFA Mobile app on Android and iOS. To improve the rating of your virtual FIFA Mobile Ultimate Team, your options are to play the videogame, waste actual coin on in-game lifts, or now, play in the real world while use the GMR insole and Tag. You &# x27; ll have particular goals to hit–like 40 powerful kills in a week–to earn coins and ability increases in the virtual activity. The more real-world accomplishments you complete, the very best your virtual team can be.

The blending of the physical and digital worlds, whether for a game or an art project, got any idea that &# x27; s gaining popularity–just look at any toy that has an augmented actuality ingredient. But unlike most AR structures, the Tag isn &# x27; t using a camera to analyze its borders. It employs machine learning to identify the wearer &# x27; s hoof and body movements at a much more sophisticated level compared to understanding hand gestures on a jean jacket.

“Jacquard is no longer just about the textiles and the yarn and the connectivity through your sleeve, ” says Dan Giles, product manager for Jacquard at Google. “It &# x27; s all been about wreaking ambient calculating to our users in a new way that &# x27; s familiar to them and the objects around them.”

Analyzing Movement
Photograph: Google

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When you buy the GMR insole, you get a pair of places( one for each shoe) and one Jacquard Tag. It &# x27; s the same Tag that comes in Levi &# x27; s newer coats or the YSL backpack. Choose which shoe you crave the Tag to be in, and you can put a dummy Tag in the other to feel balanced. After pairing the electronics with the FIFA game, you slip on your cleats and head out to a environment. Your phone doesn &# x27; t need to be anywhere near you while you run around; the Tag moves its machine learning algorithms locally on the device.

It &# x27; s smart enough to know that it doesn &# x27; t need to track your walk to the pitch. Instead, the Tag simply starts using the bulk of its computing power where reference is detects you &# x27; re actively manufacturing moves usual of football. How does the Tag know what those pushes are like? It has sensors inside that can measure acceleration and angular rotations as well as a microcontroller that can run neural networks, which are algorithmic programs that are taught to recognize patterns.

“We had to build a whole suite of new machine learning algorithms that can take the sensor data coming from the Tag and perform this based on what the motions are, ” says Nicholas Gillian, precede machine learning engineer for Google ATAP.

You can learn a lot by looking at blueprints. Data coming from a smuggler, for example, will ogle steady across the duration of their workout, and exceedingly cyclical. Data from a footballer will appear much more erratic, with sudden spates and fast turns mixed with times of little activity. Gillian says Google worked with Adidas, EA, and soccer experts to collect data from parties playing in different contexts( whether during prepare or an actual play ). That data was then used to train thousands of neural networks to understand these complicated football gestures. The data is anonymized so it &# x27; s not tied to a specific user, there are still &# x27; s no GPS or location-tracking abilities in the hardware.

The neural networks are so well trained now that the Tag can recognize when you make a fast turn, when you &# x27; re kicking the pellet, how far you &# x27; ve led, your top speed, whether you are passing or hitting, and how potent your kicks are. It can even estimate the dance &# x27; s rapidity when you are knock it. All this is happening in real meter as the actor moves.

Gillian noted that these machine learning representations are often gigabytes in width. The ATAP team managed to export its system down to a few kilobytes so it could run on the Tag–similarly to how Google wither Google Assistant &# x27; s algorithms so it could run locally on its Pixel phones.

In the context of the FIFA app though, the player will need to head back to their phone and wait for the data to be sent to the videogame to see progress on their goals. You can play soccer commonly, or you can specifically try to thumped the goals and targets required to progress your virtual team in the videogame. It doesn &# x27; t trouble if you &# x27; re an expert or an amateur, since the Google team specific made sure to collect data from musicians with going levels of expertise.

“We &# x27; re not asking you to play soccer in a different way, ” Giles said. “Just go play soccer the direction you always play.”

The Next Wave of Computing

Google has gradually been moving to this future of ambient computing, where the tech is seamlessly inserted into your surrounds. Its most recent Pixel telephones have a sensor that can identify hand gesticulates, granting owners to wave their side above the telephone to switch music racetracks or play and interrupt music, without having to touch the phone or speak a singer bid. The phone also has sensors that can detect if the owner has been in a vehicle accident, based on machine learning algorithms of what happens during accidents, and will contact emergency services if it doesn &# x27; t listen a response.

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“I do think there &# x27; s a direction toward these motion-based dominances, ” Giles says. “It &# x27; s this vision of ambient computing–getting it out of these smartphones or even laptops and moving it into an locality that &# x27; s closer to the user with more natural interactions. We enjoy this idea of taking ambient computing and precisely subsuming it, certainly disguising it in the products we &# x27; re exploiting. It shouldn &# x27; t be explicit; it should just be there, add value to you in such a natural, interactive road that you don &# x27; t even know it &# x27; s there.”

Jacquard is just one arm of Google &# x27; s ambient computing pulpit, but it achieves this eyesight far more clearly than anything else. Giles says the team started with soccer because most of the game &# x27; s gestures can be understood only through the foot, but the technology can be expanded to a wide number of other applications.

“Whether you set it in a wrist band or headband, it &# x27; s the same example and scaffold, ” Giles says.


Norway and the -Aha moment that constituted electric cars the answer

0

A country fuelled by hydropower has become the worlds electrical vehicle leader

In 1995, the lead singer of the 1980 s band -Aha and the head of the Norwegian environmental group Bellona climbed improbably into a converted electric Fiat Panda they had imported from Switzerland and went off on a road trip.

They drove around Oslo refusing to pay the city’s sky-high superhighway fees, parking illegally wherever they could, and ignoring every sanction notice they were given. Eventually, the authorities impounded their auto and auctioned it off to cover the fines.

But the stunt captivated massive media attention, and the point was constituted. Soon after, electric vehicles were exempted from road fees, one of a large raft of incentives that have, over the years, helped represent Norway the country with the world’s highest per capita electric vehicle ownership.

covering climate now series linker

Last month, in an economy hit by the coronavirus crisis, amply electric cars to be taken into consideration merely under 60% of Norway’s brand-new gondola market, and plug-in hybrids only over 15%- mean three in four of all new autoes sold were either wholly or partly electric.

It still has some mode to go, but “the two countries ” seems on route to meet a government target- set in 2016, with full cross-party parliamentary support- of phasing out the sale of all brand-new fossil-fuel based vehicles and light-colored commercial vehicles by 2025.

” It’s actually pretty amazing how fast the mindset’s changed ,” said Christina Bu of the Norwegian EV Electric Vehicle Association.” Even in 2013 or 2014, parties were sceptical. Now, a majority of Norwegians will say: my next automobile is likely to be electrical .”

The story of how and why that has happened has a straightforward, if unexpected logic. First, despite has become a major oil and gas producer, almost all of Norway’s domestic vigour comes from a single, and renewable, root: hydropower.

That necessitates swapping to EVs is a much greener option for Norway than for countries whose power is generated chiefly by coal floras- and that if it wants to significantly reduce its release levels, it has little choice but to dark-green its transport sector.

Driven by the environmental imperative, the government began offering incentives to buy and extend electric cars as far back as 1990, first by introducing a temporary exception from Norway’s exorbitant vehicle purchase tax, which became permanent six years later.

” This represents an important step ,” Bu said.” Norway was a very poor country before we detected petroleum; gondolas were a indulgence component. They’ve always been tariffed very highly. Gondolas in Norway are a lot more expensive than elsewhere. Without the obtain imposition, the cost of an electric car basically fell to that of an ordinary automobile .”

Since then, electric car drivers have been given the right to park free of charge in some municipal parking lot, drive in bus paths, take shuttles without air tickets and, thanks to -Aha, drive toll-free. They are not required to pay VAT on their autoes, or road excise, and firm electric cars are taxed at a lower frequency than petrol or diesel vehicles.

Some measures have changed over the years: to be allowed to drive in a bus road, for example, you now need to be carrying a passenger. A so-called 50% ruler was introduced in 2017, giving local authorities to charge EV operators up to 50% of the parking fees, street fees and boat rates be applied to fossil-fuel vehicles.

But overall, said Bu, the” combining of a big one-off saving when you buy the car, plus the substantially lower costs- fuel, tolls, parking, upkeep- of actually driving it, still includes up to a very powerful fiscal polemic. Over its lifetime, “youve been” save a great deal of money with an electric car in Norway .”

That was certainly what influenced Wenche Charlotte Egelund, 57, who purchased a VW Golf Electric with her collaborator two years ago when they moved out of central Oslo.” The motivations were crucial ,” she said.” The tariff and VAT exemptions, free municipal parking, free toll roads that means that we are avoid the rush-hour traffic jam .”

EV
EV bill depots at Kongens Gate near Akershus Festning in Oslo. Photograph: Bloomberg via Getty Images

In fact, Egelund said, the incentives were so significant that she almost” felt the decision was imposed on me. Financially, it was like there was no other sensible alternative. I do wonder whether it really is as dark-green as we are told. Is a auto operating on clean diesel truly worse than the environmental impact of producing an EV battery ?”

Rachel Ritman, 56, a postwoman living on the outskirts of Fredrikstad, bought her Opel Ampera two years ago and said she has not repented her option, even though they are she was ” not sure we would have gone electrical without the incentives “. The car’s assortment was good, she said: 250 miles( 400 km) in summer, 200 miles( 320 km) in winter and because she bills at home she does not suffer from ” lade-angst”, or the fear of “re running out of” juice.

Both Ritman and Egelund have a second, diesel-powered car for extra-long tours, to country rooms or holidays. Sten Brathen, 55, a media consultant, bought his Nissan Leaf as a second car” for taking the children around and driving to work. But there were so many advantages that when we were getting a brand-new prime gondola last year we didn’t think twice about running electric .”

Government motivations is of crucial importance in the decision to buy, Brathen said:” I think we would have managed without the other incentives- free toll roads and parking- but the actual cost of buying was so much lower than ordinary gondolas here in Norway .” He cautioned, though, that Norway was going to need more charging stations.

Despite the incentives, EV marketings in Norway remained low until about 2010, when a number of smaller, more affordable electric cars from producers such as Mitsubishi and Nissan came to market, and improved technology necessitated big electric cars began to offer both the opening and range to manufacture them a sensible alternative for families.

Bu said the incentives were so significant that” many people say they’ve buy the most expensive car they’ve ever had when they purchase electric- Teslas, Jaguars, that kind of model- simply because they’ve calculated what kind of saving they’re going to be establish over the coming years, and feel better draws appreciation “.

That has led to accusations that Norway’s encouragement of electrical vehicles amounts to little more than tax pieces for the rich, or a cut-price second gondola. Numerous Norwegians on lower incomes can only dream of owning an electric car, and three out of four car buys are on the secondhand market.

Bu- whose organisation represents shoppers rather than producers- scorned this, is considered that” we have to change the cars we drive, and the only way to do that is to change the brand-new autoes. We can’t modify used ones “. EVs will soon make up 10% of Norway’s passenger fleet, she said, and are slowly coming on to the used market.

She said she was confident for the future of electrical vehicles, even in countries without a big renewable dominance sector, and studies show that EVs function on capability generated from fossil fuel are responsible for roughly the same level of overall CO 2 releases as petrol cars.

” As national societies, we clearly have to do two things ,” she said.” Produce more renewables and commodities- like autoes- that can run on it ,” she said.” We have to do both, as fast as possible. We can’t hang around until we’re producing 100% renewable energy .”

Electric cars are” never going to be truly environmentally friendly”, Bu said.” The primary difficulty is building the artilleries. We need clean artillery farmers in Europe. But ogle, we need transport. We need autoes and vans, especially outside our metropolitans. And for us, electrical is the answer .”

This tale shall form part of Covering Climate Now’s week of coverage focused on Climate Solutions, to tag the 50 th anniversary of Earth Day. The Guardian is the lead partner in Covering Climate Now, a world journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate fib .

Chris March Dead At 56 – Former ‘Project Runway’ Contestant& Iconic Fashion Designer – Perez Hilton

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Sad news, y’all. Chris March , a popular avant-garde costume designer — whom you may remember from the fourth season of Project Runway — has died.

He was 56 years old.

According to informants close to Chris’ household, the clothes designer died Thursday afternoon at his home from an obvious heart attack. March had been in and out of the hospital a bit over the last year, but even with that, the heart attack was completely unexpected by the physicians and loved ones.

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About two years ago, March suffered a nasty fall at his apartment, and was eventually placed in a medically-induced coma by physicians. Related to the fall, “hes having” been battling medical editions for fairly some time more recently. Up until the ending of “peoples lives” though, are consistent with TMZ , March was still designing garbs and had work projects lined up, so it’s clear nobody expected his health to take a turn like this.

His career encompassed quite a few different fashion-related television ventures, and he garmented an impressive listing of -Alist idols for his way roster, including Beyonce , Madonna , Lady GaGa , and Meryl Streep . It became a bit of an iconic thing to see Meryl in Marchnot formerly, but twice — over the years.

Plus, he had considerable video suffer, as well. Not only was the designer a finalist on Project Runway during the show’s fourth season, he likewise appeared on Project Runway All Stars , and at one point had his own substantiate on Bravo announced Mad Fashion .

Real Housewives of New York City fans ought to remember him, more, for the run he did on the display helping to find elaborate costumes for Sonja Morgan . And as you might recall from having watched the fourth season of Project Runway , March was unique for his memorable chortle, which came out pretty much all the time on the depict. As he was portrayed during the season, he was amiable, funny, and always having a good time( below ):

What a recreation and funny recognition … not to mention such a talented designer!

He prepared it to the final round of that picture, and he was working successfully far beyond it right up until his death. Truly, an impressive career.

Related: Kate Upton SLAMS Victoria’s Secret Show Organization !

Our most sincere condolences go to March’s family, friends, and loved ones during this trying time. We can’t begin to imagine what they’re going through after his death.

Rest in Peace, Chris.

We leave you with one last-place chuckle from Chris, courtesy of Andy Cohen

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This is how I’m going to remember Chris March, garmented as Lisa Vanderpump as I wear a Giggy costume he made for one of our first Halloween specials. Chris was a finalist on Season 4 of Project Runway. He designed for everyone from Beyonce, Gaga, Madonna, Meryl, Prince and numerous legendary downtown draw mistress( And Sonja Morgan !). He had a big booming laugh; he was a joy and enjoyed. #RIP

A post shared by Andy Cohen (@ bravoandy) on Sep 6, 2019 at 2:49 pm PDT

[ Image via WENN ]

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Will Ferrell Makes His Triumphant Return To ‘SNL’ – With Help From Ryan Reynolds& Tracy Morgan! – Perez Hilton

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Wow!

Good stuff … affection the voice from King Princess here!

Overall, what did y’all think of last night’s episode of Saturday Night Live, Perezcious readers ?! Did it give you some colds thinking back to Ferrell’s seven seasons on the show itself? Definitely a nice little walk down memory lane — with some surprise client virtuosoes and sugared moments along the way, right ??

We want to hear from you about it! Speak up with all your goes on last-place night’s episode of SNL in the comment section( below )…

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Jlloyd Samuel, former Aston Villa and Bolton defender, dies in gondola disintegrate

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The Trinidad and Tobago FA said it had received some appalling news

The former Aston Villa and Bolton defender Jlloyd Samuel died in a automobile crash on Tuesday morning.

” We are deeply saddened to hear of the death of our former actor Jlloyd Samuel at the age of only 37 in road traffic accidents ,” Villa said here on Twitter.

” Our participates will wear black armbands as a trade mark of respect tonight[ in the Championship play-off semi-final against Middlesbrough] and our thoughts are with his friends and family at this very difficult time .”

Samuel played 169 tournament competitions during nine years at Villa before joining Bolton in 2007, going on to realise 71 league appearings over four years. He too had loan sorceries at Gillingham and Cardiff. Most recently he has been the player-manager of the non-league society Egerton.

Samuel was capped by England from under-1 8 to under-2 1 level and was an unused substitute for a elderly international against Sweden in 2004. He decided to represent Trinidad and Tobago, triumphing two caps. He also played guild football in Iran between 2011 and 2015.

The Trinidad and Tobago FA said in a statement:” We’ve received some terrible bulletin that former national supporter and ex-Aston Villa and Bolton Wanderers participate Jlloyd Samuel been killed in a automobile crash this morning in England.

” According to reports, Jlloyd was returning home after stopping his kids off to academy and collided with an oncoming vehicle.

” The Trinidad and Tobago FA and his former national team-mates at this time provides deepest condolences to his family members both in the UK and here in Trinidad and Tobago .”

Jlloyd
Jlloyd Samuel in action for England U2 1s. Photograph: The FA/ Rex/ Shutterstock

Born in San Fernando, Trinidad, Samuel moved to the UK as a kid and attended school in Blackheath. He played for London Schoolboys and Charlton youth slopes before signing for Villa.

Cheshire police said they were called to a serious collision involving a van and a Range Rover in High Legh, Cheshire at 7:55 am.

” Sadly the driver of the car, Jlloyd Samuel, 37, from Lymm, died at the vistum ,” they said in a statement.” The move of the van, a 54 -year-old man, sustained serious injuries and has been taken to hospital .”

Norway and the -Aha moment that represented electric cars the answer

0

A country fuelled by hydropower has become the worlds electric vehicle leader

In 1995, the lead singer of the 1980 s band -Aha and the head of the Norwegian environmental group Bellona clambered improbably into a converted electric Fiat Panda they had imported from Switzerland and set off on a superhighway trip.

They drove around Oslo refusing to pay the city’s sky-high road fees, parking illegally wherever they could, and rejecting every sanction notice they were given. Eventually, the authorities concerned impounded their automobile and auctioned it off to cover the fines.

But the stunt lured massive media attention, and the point was attained. Soon after, electric vehicles were exempted from road tolls, one of a large raft of motivations that have, over the years, facilitated construct Norway the country with the world’s highest per capita electric vehicle ownership.

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Last month, in an economy hit by the coronavirus crisis, fully electric cars to be taken into consideration merely under 60% of Norway’s brand-new car sell, and plug-in composites precisely over 15%- gist three in four members of all new autoes sold were either wholly or partially electric.

It still has some direction to go, but the country ogles on trend to meet a government target- set in 2016, with full cross-party parliamentary support- of phasing out the sale of all new fossil-fuel based gondolas and light-footed commercial vehicles by 2025.

” It’s actually quite amazing how quickly the mindset’s changed ,” said Christina Bu of the Norwegian EV Electric Vehicle Association.” Even in 2013 or 2014, parties were sceptical. Now, a majority of Norwegians will say: my next gondola is likely to be electric .”

The story of how and why that has happened has a straightforward, if unexpected logic. First, despite being a major oil and gas producer, almost all of Norway’s domestic vitality comes from a single, and renewable, source: hydropower.

That signifies switching to EVs is a much greener alternative for Norway than for countries whose power is generated primarily by coal plants- and that if it wants to significantly reduce its release levels, it has little choice but to green its transport sector.

Driven by the environmental imperative, the government began offering incentives to buy and lope electric cars as far back as 1990, first by introducing a temporary exception from Norway’s exorbitant vehicle purchase tax, which became permanent six years later.

” This represents an important step ,” Bu said.” Norway was a very poor country before we detected petroleum; cars were a indulgence piece. They’ve always been taxed very highly. Autoes in Norway are a lot more expensive than elsewhere. Without the acquire charge, the cost of an electric car basically fell to that of an everyday automobile .”

Since then, electric car motorists have been given the right to park for free in some municipal parking lot, drive in bus corridors, take shuttles without air tickets and, thanks to -Aha, drive toll-free. They are not required to pay VAT on their gondolas, or road levy, and corporation electric cars are taxed at a lower proportion than petrol or diesel vehicles.

Some measures have changed over the years: to be allowed to drive in a bus path, for example, you now need to be carrying a passenger. A so-called 50% rule was introduced in 2017, letting local authorities to charge EV moves up to 50% of the parking fees, street tolls and ferrying charges applicable to fossil-fuel vehicles.

But overall, said Bu, the” combining of a big one-off saving when you buy the car, plus the substantially lower costs- ga, fees, parking, maintenance- of actually driving it, still adds up to a very powerful financial contention. Over its lifetime, “youve been” save a great deal of money with an electric car in Norway .”

That was certainly what persuaded Wenche Charlotte Egelund, 57, who bought a VW Golf Electric with her partner two years ago when they moved out of central Oslo.” The incentives were crucial ,” she said.” The taxation and VAT exemptions, free municipal parking, free toll roads that mean we avoid paying rush-hour traffic jams .”

EV
EV charge terminals at Kongens Gate near Akershus Festning in Oslo. Photograph: Bloomberg via Getty Images

In fact, Egelund said, the incentives were so significant that she almost” felt the decision was imposed on me. Financially, it was like there was no other sensible option. I do wonder whether it really is as green as we are told. Is a auto ranging on clean diesel truly worse than the environmental impact of producing an EV battery ?”

Rachel Ritman, 56, a postwoman living on the outskirts of Fredrikstad, bought her Opel Ampera two years ago and said she has not regretted her choice, even if she was ” not sure we would have gone electrical without the incentives “. The car’s stray was good, she said: 250 miles( 400 km) in summer, 200 miles( 320 km) in wintertime and because she bills at home she does not suffer from ” lade-angst”, or the concerns of running out of juice.

Both Ritman and Egelund have a second, diesel-powered car for extra-long tours, to country compartments or holidays. Sten Brathen, 55, a media consultant, bought his Nissan Leaf as a second car” for taking the children around and driving to work. But there were so many advantages that “when hes” going a brand-new main gondola last year we didn’t think twice about get electric .”

Government motivations were vital in the decision to buy, Brathen said:” I think we would have managed without the other motivations- free toll roads and parking- but the actual cost of buying was so much lower than ordinary autoes here in Norway .” He reminded, though, that Norway was going to need more charging stations.

Despite the incentives, EV sales in Norway remained low until about 2010, when a number of smaller, more inexpensive electric cars from makers such as Mitsubishi and Nissan came to market, and improved technology made large electric cars began to offer both the cavity and range to oblige them a sensible alternative for families.

Bu said the incentives were so significant that” numerous people say they’ve bought the most expensive car they’ve ever had when they buy electric- Teslas, Jaguars, that kind of model- simply because they’ve calculated what kind of saving they’re going to be oblige over the coming years, and feel it constructs feel “.

That has led to accusations that Norway’s encouragement of electrical vehicles amounts to little more than tax gashes for the rich, or a cut-price second car. Many Norwegians on lower incomes can only dream of owning an electric car, and three out of four auto purchases are on the secondhand market.

Bu- whose organisation represents purchasers rather than makes- accepted this, is considered that” we have to change the cars we drive, and the only way to do that is to change the new autoes. We can’t alter used ones “. EVs will soon make up 10% of Norway’s passenger fleet, she said, and are slowly coming on to the used market.

She said she was confident for the future of electric vehicles, even in countries without a big renewable capability sphere, and studies show that EVs rush on influence generated from fossil fuel are responsible for roughly the same level of overall CO 2 emissions as petrol cars.

” As national societies, we clearly is therefore necessary to do two things ,” she said.” Produce more renewables and makes- like cars- that can run on it ,” she said.” We is therefore necessary to do both, as fast as possible. We can’t hang around until we’re producing 100% renewable energy resources .”

Electric automobiles are” never going to be truly environmentally friendly”, Bu said.” The main problem is clearing the batteries. We need clean artillery creators in Europe. But seem, we need transport. We need cars and vans, specially outside our cities. And for us, electric is the answer .”

This story shall form part of Covering Climate Now’s week of coverage focused on Climate Solutions, to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of Earth Day. The Guardian is the lead partner in Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate story .